mal on March 02, 2007, 11:59:12 pm
Was the immortal opera Die Alamo was produced by Walt Disney?

For those of you too young to remember, practically every boy in America had a coonskin cap in the mid 50s.† All due to Disney and this song:

Davy, Davy Crockett,
King of the wild frontier.

Born on a mountaintop in Tennessee,
Prettiest state in the land of the free,
Learned the woods 'till he knew every tree,
Killed him a bar when he was only three.

Davy, Davy Crockett,
King of the wild frontier.


Notice the difference?† But then, in that version, he died at the Alamo.

Rocketman on March 03, 2007, 10:00:34 am
I do indeed remember that song.  Until Gilligan's Island came along it was probably the most popular tunes that a young boy would sing to himself.  In fact I remember that my first BB gun was carved with the motto that he lived by.  "Always aim to be careful and always be careful to aim."

Rocketman on March 05, 2007, 06:51:17 pm
By the way, I do believe the refrain went...

"Born on a mountain top in Tennessee
Greenest in the land of the free
Raised in the woods so he knew every tree
Killed him a bar when he was only three."

At least that's the way I remember it.

wdg3rd on March 06, 2007, 11:33:29 am
A little use of a popular search engine brings up:


Born on a mountain top in Tennessee,
Greenest state in the land of the free.
Raised in the woods so's he knew every tree,
Killed him a bear when he was only three.
Davy, Davy Crockett King of the Wild Frontier.

He fought single handed through the Injun war,
Till the Creeks was whipped and peace was restored.
And while he was handling this risky chore,
Made himself a legend, forevermore.
Davy, Davy Crockett the man who don't know fear.

When he lost his love, and his grief was gall,
In his heart he wanted to leave it all,
And lose himself in the forest tall,
But he answered instead, his country's call.
Davy, Davy Crockett, the choice of the whole frontier

He went off to Congress and served a spell
Fixin' up the government and laws as well.
Took over Washington, so we hear tell,
And patched up the crack in the Liberty Bell.
Davy, Davy Crockett, seein' his duty clear. (Serving his country well)

When he come home, his politickin' done,
The western march had just begun.
So he packed his gear, and his trusty gun
And lit out a grinnin' to follow the sun.
Davy, Davy Crockett, Leadin the Pioneers.

His land is biggest, and his land is best
From grassy plains to the mountain crest
He's ahead of us all in meeting the test
Followin' his legend right into the West
Davy, Davy Crockett, King of the Wide Frontier
King of the Wild Frontier.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Rocketman on March 06, 2007, 06:17:29 pm
The first and second stanza's are just like I remember it.  The third I don't remember at all.  The fourth I seem to remember the line about the "Liberty Bell".  Fifth I don't remember and the sixth seems a little different somehow. ???

archy on May 01, 2007, 09:59:58 am
Was the immortal opera Die Alamo was produced by Walt Disney?

For those of you too young to remember, practically every boy in America had a coonskin cap in the mid 50s.† All due to Disney and this song:

[

As a youngun, I lernt a diff'rent song: http://www.cloudstorm.com/ballad.html

In the southern part of Texas, in the town of San Antone,
There's a fortress all in ruin that the weeds have overgrown.
You may look in vain for crosses and you'll never see a one,
But sometime between the setting and the rising of the sun,
You can hear a ghostly bugle as the men go marching by;
You can hear them as they answer to that roll call in the sky:
Colonel Travis, Davy Crockett and a hundred eighty more;
Captain Dickenson, Jim Bowie, present and accounted for.

Back in 1836, Houston said to Travis:
"Get some volunteers and go fortify the Alamo."
Well, the men came from Texas and from old Tennessee,
And they joined up with Travis just to fight for the right to be free.

Indian scouts with squirrel guns, men with muzzle loaders,
Stood together heel and toe to defend the Alamo.
"You may never see your loved ones," Travis told them that day.
"Those that want to can leave now, those who'll fight to the death, let 'em stay."

In the sand he drew a line with his army sabre,
Out of a hundred eighty five, not a soldier crossed the line.
With his banners a-dancin' in the dawn's golden light,
Santa Anna came prancin' on a horse that was black as the night.

He sent an officer to tell Travis to surrender.
Travis answered with a shell and a rousin' rebel yell.
Santa Anna turned scarlet: "Play DegŁello," he roared.
"I will show them no quarter, everyone will be put to the sword."

One hundred and eighty five holdin' back five thousand.
Five days, six days, eight days, ten; Travis held and held again.
Then he sent for replacements for his wounded and lame,
But the troops that were comin' never came, never came, never came.

Twice he charged, then blew recall. On the fatal third time,
Santa Anna breached the wall and he killed them one and all.
Now the bugles are silent and there's rust on each sword,
And the small band of soldiers lie asleep in the arms of The Lord.

In the southern part of Texas, near the town of San Antone,
Like a statue on his Pinto rides a cowboy all alone.
And he sees the cattle grazin' where a century before,
Santa Anna's guns were blazin' and the cannons used to roar.
And his eyes turn sort of misty, and his heart begins to glow,
And he takes his hat off slowly to the men of Alamo.
To the thirteen days of glory at the seige of Alamo.


http://www.martyrobbins.com/
Ah'm just a lowly salesman for the Deef Smith Greeting Card Company....

 

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