myrkul999 on May 31, 2012, 01:39:29 am
Ramesh still isn't playing it smart. He didn't even try to educate her, just knuckled under.

If talking with you has taught me anything, it's that you cannot educate a stone.

sam on May 31, 2012, 02:54:08 am
You only get sulfites in anaerobic environment, such as wine.


No, that's wrong. Sulfites are manufactured in aerobic conditions. Sulfite reaction with oxygen is very weak at room temperature, as stated above.

The amount of sulfite in aerobic water at room temperature declines by a few percent over a few minutes, so in a few hours, would be all gone.  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/bit.260370416/pdf

The attempt to ban sulfur is motivated by the same evil madness as the attempt to ban chlorine.  You guys want bans so broad as to make human life impossible, thereby granting limitless power to our greenie overlords.

The elimination of sulfides is a little more complex and dependent on circumstances, than the elimination of sulfites, but the same basic principle applies: In the presence of air, does not last long.

sam on May 31, 2012, 03:15:36 am
The attempt to ban magnesium is, I assume, a parody of the equally ludicrous real life movement to ban chlorine.

Another parody of the real life chlorine movement is the movement to ban dihydrogen oxide.

mellyrn on May 31, 2012, 06:51:50 am
Quote
The attempt to ban magnesium is, I assume, a parody of the equally ludicrous real life movement to ban chlorine.

In '95, I moved into a house far enough out that it was on its own well.  Since then I have moved a couple of times, scrupulously avoiding homes on municipal water each time.  I currently have both a well and a cistern.  I won't ban stuff from your water; so long as I can avoid somebody else's idea of what I "should" have in my water, I'm cool.

ConditionOne on May 31, 2012, 06:54:46 am
I'm no scientist, but I live in the country with a well and I don't see how sulfur is a big deal. Sure, it smells, but we just put some in a pitcher and let it air out, and its OK.  Amish up here drink it, and they are the healthiest people you'll ever meet.

customdesigned on May 31, 2012, 06:58:23 am
Ramesh still isn't playing it smart. He didn't even try to educate her, just knuckled under.

And his assistant is recommending increasing the price of the water they produce rather than cutting the cost somewhere else in the company. Not a smart business move.
If it was me, I would create a new package, with "NOW WITH REDUCED MAGNESIUM" prominently displayed on the label, and charge a higher price.  But also offer "ORIGINAL FORMULA" at the lower price.  If the magnesium testing results are reproducible, I might even process the "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" differently.

It might be necessary to change "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" to "MAGNESIUM FREE" with a footnote in tiny print defining "FREE" as "reduced by at least 90% according to test X".  Depending on the mental thickness of my customers.

bjdotson on May 31, 2012, 09:09:08 am
Ramesh still isn't playing it smart. He didn't even try to educate her, just knuckled under.

And his assistant is recommending increasing the price of the water they produce rather than cutting the cost somewhere else in the company. Not a smart business move.
If it was me, I would create a new package, with "NOW WITH REDUCED MAGNESIUM" prominently displayed on the label, and charge a higher price.  But also offer "ORIGINAL FORMULA" at the lower price.  If the magnesium testing results are reproducible, I might even process the "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" differently.

It might be necessary to change "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" to "MAGNESIUM FREE" with a footnote in tiny print defining "FREE" as "reduced by at least 90% according to test X".  Depending on the mental thickness of my customers.


I love this approach. Satisfies everybody

Rbsnedd on May 31, 2012, 03:04:47 pm
Ramesh still isn't playing it smart. He didn't even try to educate her, just knuckled under.

And his assistant is recommending increasing the price of the water they produce rather than cutting the cost somewhere else in the company. Not a smart business move.
If it was me, I would create a new package, with "NOW WITH REDUCED MAGNESIUM" prominently displayed on the label, and charge a higher price.  But also offer "ORIGINAL FORMULA" at the lower price.  If the magnesium testing results are reproducible, I might even process the "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" differently.

It might be necessary to change "REDUCED MAGNESIUM" to "MAGNESIUM FREE" with a footnote in tiny print defining "FREE" as "reduced by at least 90% according to test X".  Depending on the mental thickness of my customers.


I love this approach. Satisfies everybody
Seems like a good idea and, come to think of it not far off what happens with the whole bottled water craze.

One general question I have about the current story is where the Vesta colony actualy gets its water from?
Presumably some of it will come from comets or small water asteroids or moons but just how much is recycled?

sam on May 31, 2012, 04:27:59 pm
I don't see how sulfur is a big deal. Sure, it smells, but we just put some in a pitcher and let it air out, and its OK

The smell is sulfides.  If there are sulfides, you are drawing water from anaerobic rocks, in which case there are also a lot of sulfites, indeed all the sulfates will have been converted into sulfites.

Since airing gets rid of sulfites faster than it gets rid of sulfides, by the time it no longer smells, it will be reasonably free of sulfites - all the sulfites will have been converted back into sulfates.

Hans Rancke on May 31, 2012, 07:58:23 pm
One general question I have about the current story is where the Vesta colony actualy gets its water from?
Presumably some of it will come from comets or small water asteroids or moons but just how much is recycled?
Unless Vesta is emitting water, everything is recycled (or at least retained inside Vesta; some of it may be tied up in the form of rust). Which means that the amount of water would be increasing, since the human metabolic cycle produces water (Or so I've been informed).


Hans 

wdg3rd on May 31, 2012, 09:57:55 pm
For hundreds (thousands?) of years, water with various aromatic sulfur compounds has been considered healthy.  "Taking the waters" in places like England's Bath.  Or the various hot springs in the Rockies (I'm especially fond of Thermopolis Wyoming and Lava Hot Springs Idaho and can't recall the name of the one in the Bitterroot Mountains that Lisa especially loved, it was the stinkiest we visited).  The water was sufficiently potable all of those places, you get used to the aroma and I always liked the taste.

I'm in New Jersey.  I deal with government approved levels of dioxin in the local water and I can't smell or taste that.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

sam on May 31, 2012, 11:40:04 pm
For hundreds (thousands?) of years, water with various aromatic sulfur compounds has been considered healthy.  "Taking the waters" in places like England's Bath.  Or the various hot springs in the Rockies (I'm especially fond of Thermopolis Wyoming and Lava Hot Springs Idaho and can't recall the name of the one in the Bitterroot Mountains that Lisa especially loved, it was the stinkiest we visited).  The water was sufficiently potable all of those places, you get used to the aroma and I always liked the taste.

If it stank, there were probably sulfides in it, if sulfides, probably quite a lot of sulfites.

ContraryGuy on June 01, 2012, 12:17:54 am
Hmm, so a thought occurs.  Do they still use "Milk of Magnesia" or it's more palatable equivalent?  Ah well this thread (NOT EFT) is getting a bit tedious due to troll droppings.   Seriously,  if one finds the comic and it's debate threads so objectionable then why read it and post things simply to annoy the other readers?  Yes, this is just a 'comic' and a work of fiction, but it is NOT baseless speculation, it is an intellectual exercise and a pretty damn good work of Science Fiction. 
BTW when Marx and Engals wrote the communist manifesto I'd bet money that it was considered far fetched fiction at the time yet it was responsible for the murder of over 200 million people.  While it's got its own inherent problems (calls for the golden rule which most people fall far short of etc.)  I'll take AnCap over Team Girl's brand of Marxism hands down. 

What brand of marxism is Team Girl proposing/supporting?  How is it different from the oligopoly that is AnCap?

And finally, why do you refuse to admit that AnCap is an oligopoly?

Andreas on June 01, 2012, 12:35:33 am
How is an oligopoly different from an oligarchy? This is the first time I encounter the former term...

myrkul999 on June 01, 2012, 12:48:49 am
How is an oligopoly different from an oligarchy? This is the first time I encounter the former term...
oligopoly
Quote
noun
the market condition that exists when there are few sellers, as a result of which they can greatly influence price and other market factors.

Somewhat like a trust, but less sinister. Not going to say it won't happen, since it might, in industries where the economy of scale is such that big businesses have a natural advantage over smaller ones.

 

anything