customdesigned on March 18, 2012, 01:02:32 pm
The wild west featured much violence between willing combatants.  But very little of the kind of strong preying on weak violence that is prevalent today.

http://www.guncite.com/wild_west_myth.html

The picture painted by the above article reminds me strongly of the AnCap society describe in EFT.

Have we had a duel in EFT?  I've read the whole thing, but I may have fogotten it.

SandySandfort on March 18, 2012, 06:19:39 pm
Have we had a duel in EFT?  I've read the whole thing, but I may have fogotten it.

Sort of. It starts here:

http://www.bigheadpress.com/eft?page=783

Goes to here:

http://www.bigheadpress.com/eft?page=787

Resumes here:

http://www.bigheadpress.com/eft?page=799

And ends here:

http://www.bigheadpress.com/eft?page=818

BTW, strictly speaking, duels are homicides if someone is killed; just not murder.

NotDebonair on April 17, 2012, 08:57:03 am
The wild west featured much violence between willing combatants.  But very little of the kind of strong preying on weak violence that is prevalent today.

My perception of it is the opposite; the strong preying on the weak was so normal that it did not deserve comment.  To be weak was considered culpable in itself.  There were many fewer weaklings because they were killed off so quickly, not necessarily by violence, but also by weather and disease, aggravated by their being driven off of the desirable, survivable locations.

mellyrn on April 18, 2012, 08:11:21 am
Quote
strong preying on the weak

I'd need a definition of "strong" and "weak".  A very tough hardass who can't make or keep friends has a fair chance of being outlived by a kind & loving tenderheart with a big support network.  There's probably a reason why the dominant species on Earth is a social species and not one of solitaries, however powerful.

Andreas on April 18, 2012, 02:44:47 pm
Our species' preferred way is "the many preying on the few".
It works on mammoths, and it works on people too.
That, and jog-till-it-drops.

 

anything