SandySandfort on February 25, 2012, 08:30:45 pm
...
Care to guess who the sergeant was?

I assume congratulations are in order. Or should I just say, "Doh!"

Apollo-Soyuz on February 25, 2012, 08:48:55 pm
BTW, if the shuttle was suppose to be a ôspace truck", am I to assume the "Highball Express" is suppose to be a fast "space train"?


(makes more sense than a "space cocktail" anyway)

Oneil on February 26, 2012, 01:54:25 am
No one said anything about an armed invasion.  The objective is traveling a known course and would be empty prior to a de-orbit burn.

.......

No debate on the empty state to begin with.  However some had proposed a armed team be sent to retake the station, that wouldn't be necessary or as I pointed out the biggest threat to anyone stealing the empty station.

Being empty doesn't imply the only method available to monitor the station is watching it's orbital position for change.  Cycling any of the airlocks would light up a panel / set off alerts planet side.  And long before you reach an airlock, the Proximity Radar's used in docking would expose the approach of the plotters.   At that point their every action can be quickly viewed remotely via camera feed.

Still personally,   Having felt we all lost something with allowing first Skylab in 1979 then Mir in 2001 to re-enter and burn up, any storyline that has the ISS escaping a similar wasteful demise is entertaining.

Andreas on February 27, 2012, 12:47:21 am
You raise an interesting point about Sealand, however unless NASA has not scrapped the shuttles in the EFT universe, there really isn't anything the US, or any other nation could do to STOP someone from 'stealing' an abandoned ISS.  It takes months to make a shuttle ready for an ISS mission (or any mission for that matter) and I believe in OUR universe, they have all been rendered unusable.  The Russians could probably get a Soyuz ready faster, but 3 guys isn't exactly a dynamic entry team.  And let's not forget that one bullet not in a body ruins Everybody's day.

They wouldn't have to go inside: they'd just need to send up an astronaut with a Armbrust recoilless rifle; you can ruin everybody's day from the outside, too. Especially if you're NOT trying to preserve the station. The thing is, giving advance warning of a land-grab is a surefire way to fail. Look at how Argentina is talking about the Falklands again; presto, a new class of superdestroyer at their proverbial maritime doorstep, capable of shooting down their planes as they take off from their home bases! Get possession, then keep it. There's no other way. Oops, seems like this has already been handled.

Anyway, look at Leon go; he's leaving nothing to chance: They'll win/buy the contract to de-orbit the station, and then they have all the time in the world (well, at least barely enough) to prep it and de-orbit it... but in the opposite direction of what's expected. Up, up and away! :D Wheee!

Technically they're doing the job they're paid for... although it's highly doubtful if they'll receive any appreciation :D :P
« Last Edit: February 27, 2012, 01:27:57 am by Andreas »

mellyrn on February 27, 2012, 08:13:07 am
(page 899) "Over the next decade . . . "

Oooo, I am so in love!  How I admire long-range thinking!

dough560 on February 27, 2012, 04:00:53 pm
Love a practical demonstration of the 5P's in action.  Now to see how this play's out.

Three can keep a secret if two are dead.  It'll be interesting to see how the eventual security leak is handled.

VonZorch on February 28, 2012, 10:57:36 am
No one said anything about an armed invasion.  The objective is traveling a known course and would be empty prior to a de-orbit burn.

.......

Cycling any of the airlocks would light up a panel / set off alerts planet side.  And long before you reach an airlock, the Proximity Radar's used in docking would expose the approach of the plotters.
Easily dealt with.  You make part of your de-orbit proposal using the station as a work base while installing the de-orbiting engines.  Now it's an expected event and causes no alarm.  Docking will not cause an alarm in any case as the easiest way to connect the de-orbiter is to use the main docking port.

dough560 on February 28, 2012, 01:35:28 pm
VonZorch is correct.  If everything worked properly and according to plan, the Powers That Be would not have any idea what was up, until the ISS took off at the top of the elliptical orbit.

Plans are perfect until they meet reality.

Andreas on February 28, 2012, 02:04:55 pm
VonZorch is correct.  If everything worked properly and according to plan, the Powers That Be would not have any idea what was up, until the ISS took off at the top of the elliptical orbit.

Plans are perfect until they meet reality.
Well, that's moot now, since they'll be arriving at the ISS with a VIP pass!
Come to think of it, it's sort of an inverse trojan horse thing: where they arrive to destroy the "city", except they cram it full of people, and cart it off to "sea"... Leon has something in common with Odysseus, there, but I guess his less jaded personality is testament to some improvement of society, compared to the god-ridden hell-hole of dickhead cockfights that was Classical times  ;D

wdg3rd on February 28, 2012, 06:10:29 pm
Andreas, if you haven't checked it out already, I recommend "Odysseus the Rebel" complete elsewhere here on bigheadpress.com.  A great retelling of the Odyssey.  It features Odysseus as my favorite kind of atheist, one who knows the gods are there but doesn't like them or put up with any more of their crap than he has to, much like my own relationship with government.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Norman on February 28, 2012, 07:06:18 pm
So, is this the "Highball Express"  cute name to which Terry refers, or is this another cute name entirely?  I hope to find out tomorrow!

Andreas on February 29, 2012, 12:19:49 am
Andreas, if you haven't checked it out already, I recommend "Odysseus the Rebel" complete elsewhere here on bigheadpress.com.  A great retelling of the Odyssey.  It features Odysseus as my favorite kind of atheist, one who knows the gods are there but doesn't like them or put up with any more of their crap than he has to, much like my own relationship with government.


Yeah, I read it just the other day... my sleep cycle really loves it when I read a webcomic in one sitting  ::)
I guess Atheist is all sorts of wrong for Odysseus as portrayed, since an atheist is one that believes there are no gods. Something I find to be a bit paradoxical.
I prefer axing the "belief" part entirely  ;D

Norman on February 29, 2012, 12:33:54 am
An anagram engine?  An interesting concept....<searches for an anagram engine, finds one on Easypeasy.com, tests it with Iron Flames>

Is there "Life on Mars"?   Heh, there will be! ^_^

Also, I've heard of rust described as the flame of  iron, so there's another link to Mars...

myrkul999 on February 29, 2012, 02:03:45 am
This arc finally got me to register. :)

I'd like to point out one thing:
An escape burn and a de-orbit burn differ primarily in only one factor.

Vector.

Done right, the station will be well on it's way to Mars before the bureaucrats even realize the burn was pointed in the "wrong" direction. Packing up Troy and carting it off to sea, indeed.

SandySandfort on February 29, 2012, 07:27:16 am
An anagram engine?  An interesting concept....<searches for an anagram engine, finds one on Easypeasy.com, tests it with Iron Flames>

Yup, I used the Internet Anagram Server (http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/) for this arc. While not an anagram, the title of this story is also cutesy: GONE MISSING. (Get it?)

Is there "Life on Mars"?   Heh, there will be! ^_^

Also, I've heard of rust described as the flame of  iron, so there's another link to Mars...

That didn't occur to me. Serendipity!