Damocles on September 09, 2011, 04:56:16 am
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.

mellyrn on September 09, 2011, 06:08:34 am
Umm, it's being used by "Nappy", the idolizer of Napoleon.  Might be an affectation on his part.

sams on September 09, 2011, 06:32:09 am
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.

What is your problem ?

The expression is being used in EFT and might revive because of it. Word usage doesn't happen in thin air, it happen by people using it and EFT is using it.

SandySandfort on September 09, 2011, 08:42:45 am
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.

Egads and little fishes! That is so cool and totally retro! Just like we said in the Mars arc, "Everything old, is new again."

dough560 on September 09, 2011, 04:53:01 pm
language like styles have cycles.  It just keeps coming around again and again.

macharuadh on September 20, 2011, 05:19:17 pm
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.


Okay, I usually just lurk, but this got my attention - I have, on a regular basis for the last thirty-plus years, used the phrase "God's teeth!".  Picked it up during my Renaissance Faire days and just never quit using it.  It amuses me.  You may pick up the pieces of your assertion at the door - please provide your own box.  :D

ContraryGuy on September 22, 2011, 12:41:19 pm
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.


Okay, I usually just lurk, but this got my attention - I have, on a regular basis for the last thirty-plus years, used the phrase "God's teeth!".  Picked it up during my Renaissance Faire days and just never quit using it.  It amuses me.  You may pick up the pieces of your assertion at the door - please provide your own box.  :D
Odds Bodkins and Gadzooks!  A fight over colloquial  language!  Round One, Fight!

Scott on October 08, 2011, 04:18:04 pm
For a while I used to swear by Odin's testes but I got tired of it.

Sieggy on October 10, 2011, 03:38:32 pm
Being an ancient SCAdian who still delights in freaking the mundanes, I take great satisfaction when I can get someone to blow a mouthful of beer out their noses with a medieval curse or rejoinder . . .  I still have fond memories of a lady spraying her obnoxious twit of a boyfriend with a hearty "oh, hellfire and foxfarts!".

paddyfool on October 16, 2011, 11:07:01 am
"Hell's teeth" is a more common epithet in my family.

Random trivia on slang: "God's teeth" seems to derive from the Elizabethan era.  As is the fine  epithet "Zounds!", short for "God's wounds" and first found in Shakespeare.  It may have been doing the rounds in his time; or it may have been a neologism to surprise and entertain his audience.  "Gadzooks" similarly came from "God's hooks", a reference to the nails on the cross. 

Karadan on October 27, 2011, 12:12:24 am
People haven't used that expression in the French speaking world for at least 150 years.  It is reasonable to assume that it would be used even less in the future. 

In any event, please don't encourage its propagation, as it is essentially a stereotype.  It's the equivalent of someone swearing "By the Virgin Mary!" or "God's teeth!" these days.
Hehe, God's teeth.  I like that one.
"Hell's teeth" is a more common epithet in my family.

Random trivia on slang: "God's teeth" seems to derive from the Elizabethan era.  As is the fine  epithet "Zounds!", short for "God's wounds" and first found in Shakespeare.  It may have been doing the rounds in his time; or it may have been a neologism to surprise and entertain his audience.  "Gadzooks" similarly came from "God's hooks", a reference to the nails on the cross. 
Where do zoinks and jinkies come from?

Frank B. on October 27, 2011, 08:04:15 am
Where do zoinks and jinkies come from?

Not sure, but I left my scooby snacks around here somewhere.  ;D

paddyfool on November 04, 2011, 09:25:29 am
Zoinks: "an exclamation of surprise or shock. Popularized by the Scooby Doo cartoon." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/zoinks
"The earliest and most commonly known usage of this term is from the American cartoon Scooby Doo ([1]), in which it was used regularly by one of the main characters, Norville "Shaggy" Rogers ([2])." http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoinks

Jinkies: "an exclamation of surprise. Possibly first used by the character Velma in the Scooby Doo series of cartoons." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/jinkies

So, as far as I can tell from the internets, both were invented by the creators of Scooby Doo (probably to ensure that they weren't teaching kids any real "bad words").

Frank B. on November 06, 2011, 12:29:52 pm
Zoinks: "an exclamation of surprise or shock. Popularized by the Scooby Doo cartoon." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/zoinks
"The earliest and most commonly known usage of this term is from the American cartoon Scooby Doo ([1]), in which it was used regularly by one of the main characters, Norville "Shaggy" Rogers ([2])." http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoinks

Jinkies: "an exclamation of surprise. Possibly first used by the character Velma in the Scooby Doo series of cartoons." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/jinkies

So, as far as I can tell from the internets, both were invented by the creators of Scooby Doo (probably to ensure that they weren't teaching kids any real "bad words").

Jinkies, I love a good exclamatory. Very popular TV created exclamatory getting wide use is "frak".

ContraryGuy on November 07, 2011, 07:37:12 pm
Zoinks: "an exclamation of surprise or shock. Popularized by the Scooby Doo cartoon." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/zoinks
"The earliest and most commonly known usage of this term is from the American cartoon Scooby Doo ([1]), in which it was used regularly by one of the main characters, Norville "Shaggy" Rogers ([2])." http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/zoinks

Jinkies: "an exclamation of surprise. Possibly first used by the character Velma in the Scooby Doo series of cartoons." http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meaning-of/jinkies

So, as far as I can tell from the internets, both were invented by the creators of Scooby Doo (probably to ensure that they weren't teaching kids any real "bad words").

Jinkies, I love a good exclamatory. Very popular TV created exclamatory getting wide use is "frak".


Not TV created.  Was in use by role-playing game authors 15 years previously.
But het, no-one cares about us RPG'ers, do they? 

Frak is a fine example of the use of mass media.

 

anything