dough560 on September 04, 2011, 05:52:41 am
Additionally, instead of using two dimensional weaves, why not use three dimensional weaving techniques for the skin structure?  Using this technique, wouldn't it be possible to make a multilayer skin with the multiple layers interwoven for additional strength?

UncleRice on September 17, 2011, 06:42:06 pm
The only real money is stored energy. Mercury has lots of solar energy. I don't know I'd want to live there though. Earth deserts are too much for me as it is.
Stupid criminals put on a mask and rob people with a gun.
Smart criminals put on a suit, call themselves politicians, and rob people with writ of law.

SandySandfort on September 17, 2011, 10:43:14 pm
Mercury has lots of solar energy. I don't know I'd want to live there though. Earth deserts are too much for me as it is.

There are no hot deserts at the poles. It is very cold and the craters contain oceans of water ice. With advanced technology, those craters could become Edens.

quadibloc on September 17, 2011, 11:01:08 pm
There are no hot deserts at the poles. It is very cold and the craters contain oceans of water ice. With advanced technology, those craters could become Edens.
I was surprised to learn that further south on Mercury, the land becomes cold before it crosses the terminator into night.

That spoiled my thought that a manned mission to Mercury could use a cheat similar to the one that was used for the Apollo moon landings - where the Apollo astronauts landed just after dawn, to have light to see by, but before the Moon became hot. In the case of Mercury, I would expect a landing after nightfall, with artificial lighting. But that won't work if it's already extremely cold.

So, as for the poles of Mercury - it would seem to me that the advanced technology would have to include some really advanced radiation protection.

SandySandfort on September 18, 2011, 09:12:31 am
I was surprised to learn that further south on Mercury, the land becomes cold before it crosses the terminator into night.

And considering that its solar day is exactly twice as long as its tropical year (one "day" lasts two "years"), it has plenty of time to radiate away its daytime heat and get really cold. Of course, it's not quite that simple. Because of its highly eccentric orbit, the sun appears to go backward during part of its daily journey across the sky. As a result, at certain longitudes, there are double sunrises or double sunsets.

That spoiled my thought that a manned mission to Mercury could use a cheat similar to the one that was used for the Apollo moon landings - where the Apollo astronauts landed just after dawn, to have light to see by, but before the Moon became hot. In the case of Mercury, I would expect a landing after nightfall, with artificial lighting. But that won't work if it's already extremely cold.

No, there would be a sweet spot at the beginning at sunset. Because the surface has been heated up to several hundred degrees during daylight, it will take some time (at least several days or weeks) to cool down to sub-zero temperatures. At twilight, the big problem--solar radiation--ceases. All you have to worry about is being insulated from the surface temperature. At first it will be extremely hot, then moderate, then cold. If your ship's landing gear and your boots are sufficiently well insulated, you will do just fine.


So, as for the poles of Mercury - it would seem to me that the advanced technology would have to include some really advanced radiation protection.

I'm not so sure. Mercury has a very weak magnetic field, so it would not be channeling solar radiation down into the poles. deep inside polar craters where the sun never shines, their would be essentially zero solar radiation. All that would be blocked by the crater rim walls. Cosmic radiation would be no worse than is experienced on any other solar system body without an atmosphere--Luna, Ceres or the other planetoids. And in paraterraformed craters on Mercury, you would have the airskin and a couple of kilometers of air to absorb some of that.

quadibloc on September 18, 2011, 03:16:52 pm
I'm not so sure. Mercury has a very weak magnetic field, so it would not be channeling solar radiation down into the poles. deep inside polar craters where the sun never shines, their would be essentially zero solar radiation. All that would be blocked by the crater rim walls. Cosmic radiation would be no worse than is experienced on any other solar system body without an atmosphere--Luna, Ceres or the other planetoids. And in paraterraformed craters on Mercury, you would have the airskin and a couple of kilometers of air to absorb some of that.
This is true. What has me worried would be any place on Mercury where the Sun is visible, no matter how low it is on the horizon (not enough atmosphere and all that).