quadibloc on March 10, 2011, 10:51:25 am
Nice. Not at all what is in store for our protagonists, but very creative plotting.
Thank you, but I was trying hard to avoid accidentally spoiling things by picking the most overused cliché that the current strip could have potentially hinted at.

Torn between two lovers who happen to be the same person... or, to use a genuine musical example, the Piña Colada song (even though the causative situation is not the same; they're still just getting to know each other, not in a marriage grown stale).

Let's just say that I am capable of visiting TV Tropes, spending about five minutes or so clicking on a few links, and then returning to what I was browsing before, without any great effort.

Brugle on March 10, 2011, 11:31:49 am
I once had a large-animal veterinarian as a neighbor.  One day, returning cold, wet, and muddy from work, he snarled that he was going to write a book of vet adventures himself and tell it like it really is, not all sugar-coated the way James Herriott (of All Creatures Great and Small fame) told it!

My jaw dropped.  Herriott did write very cheerfully, as one who obviously loved his work -- and he told many a tale of being pulled from a warm bed to, say, go lie in icy February mud, up to the armpit in bovine vagina getting his arm painfully squeezed in her labor contractions, trying to save a calf (not always successfully).

Herriott never gave me the impression that it was all sunshine and roses; far from it, I knew I'd never hack it if I had to do his job.

My neighbor, being a dyspeptic sort, apparently couldn't handle the idea of someone loving the job, and so he misrepresented the love as "sugar-coating".

When we firmly hold a given viewpoint, we seldom enjoy stories that challenge or defy our views.  It takes serious intellectual integrity to recognize our own bias.  I'd give GW points for reading EFT at all, except I'm not sure if he's more looking for a mental workout, or for a target upon which to vent.  I'd find the difference in whether the objections are material or emotional.

I enjoy the personal anecdotes that illustrate your points, whether I agree with you (the usual case) or not.  Thank you.

[ADDED:] Decades ago I gave my sisters copies of Tracy Kidder's The Soul of a New Machine, which I thought showed the same sort of joy that I felt in my job.  I wonder if they thought that I was just sugar-coating the long hours?
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 11:43:34 am by Brugle »

GlennWatson on March 10, 2011, 05:15:16 pm
I have no ax to grind with AnCap.  I never heard of it before I read this comic.  I will say the author tends to paint it in the most attractive light as is his right.  I don't have a problem with that.

I don't think there is anything wrong with a reader making this observation.  If anyone thinks my making this observation means I am a bad person or teacher that’s ok too.

In addition I believe heroes without flaws tend to create a weaker story.  But that is my opinion and the author is under no obligation to take it seriously.

I thought the coaster would not break down, as some others did because the author rarely, if ever, shows any aspect of AnCap society as anything less than extremely competent.  He is under no obligation to do otherwise and again I have no problem with this. 

But it is the truth.

sam on March 10, 2011, 07:03:08 pm
In addition I believe heroes without flaws tend to create a weaker story.  But that is my opinion and the author is under no obligation to take it seriously.

Also, his good guys are so virtuous, non violent, and non judgmental that they cannot deal effectively with three low life pirates (spaceship hijackers).  Instead of holding a five minute trial on video record, then throwing the pirates out the airlock, they save the pirates souls.  How would they deal effectively with a wealthy, influential, and seemingly respectable criminal with lots of guns and lawyers?  How would they deal effectively with a pirate problem on the scale of the one we have in the Indian ocean?  That lot need to be hung from the yardarm, and in space, you would need to throw them out the airlock.

We have seen one wealthy and powerful anarchist in this story - rich like Bill Gates, yet a big fan of open source, a great benefactor.  I would have found much more believable rich guys like the Ayn Rand heroes in "Atlas Shrugged".   Hank Rearden says in the movie trailer  "My only goal is to make money".   And Rand had a plentiful supply of rich and powerful villains as well as rich heroes.  A rich hero makes for a feeble story unless you have a rich and powerful villain.



spudit on March 10, 2011, 07:33:36 pm
A MOVIE!

I had no idea it was coming, they will probably trash it, dumb it down, do it no justice. Even with She Herself on the set the Fountainhead movie was so so at best, but still, it is good.

Thanks Sam

Yes I do remember the big steaming stinking pile labeled Starship Troopers
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 07:48:50 pm by spudit »
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SandySandfort on March 10, 2011, 07:36:35 pm
I thought the coaster would not break down, as some others did because the author rarely, if ever, shows any aspect of AnCap society as anything less than extremely competent.

I write about individuals. Some are competent, some of them are less so. Their are true bad guys and heroes. EFT is not a morally ambiguous French movie. If you prefer morally ambiguous characters, well, I suggest you go to more arty French films.

The coaster did not break down, because that wasn't the story I was writing. I certainly would have had no problem writing that story. Shit happens, in AnCap societies just as much as anywhere else. An upcoming story, ERROR AND TRIAL, will address a fatal rush to judgment on the part of one of our EFT characters. I have no problem writing about market anarchists getting it wrong. In the current CHRISTMAS WAR, one of the good guys, doesn't have clean hands. And remember, Reggie has a past.

BTW, Mars is not a pure AnCap society and there are "outie" enclaves that aren't AnCap at all. We have already mentioned in passing, the Martian enclaves of "Lenin's Hammer" (communist) and Nya Darra Adam Khel (clan/tribal). I have a story in mind about Vesta, which will probably be governed by something like New England town hall meetings. Technically, Mars is a Heathian meta-anarchy. So keep your pants on, Glenn, you ain't seen nothing yet.  :)

GlennWatson on March 10, 2011, 10:11:50 pm
Keep my pants on?

SandySandfort on March 10, 2011, 10:52:11 pm
Keep my pants on?

Oh my, you're not familiar with that old idiom? I'm shocked, simply shocked:

http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/keep+your+pants+on.html

quadibloc on March 11, 2011, 06:32:43 am
"There's an AI to take over if I screw up"? Them's famous last words, if you ask me.

macsnafu on March 11, 2011, 08:47:13 am
I thought the saying was "keep your shirt on."

And now Reggie wants to take Babbette for a ride.  Heh-heh-heh.  He probably disengaged the AI.

I love mankind.  It's PEOPLE I can't stand!  - Linus Van Pelt.

terry_freeman on March 11, 2011, 09:07:41 am
It was "keep your pants on" or "hold your horses" in my day.

If roller coasters often break down, they lose money. Where's the profit in that? Better to design a system which is reliable and cheap to operate.

As mentioned earlier, given the large capital investment, one wants to maximize the difference "revenues-costs". However much anti-capitalists may think that this translates to "Screw maintenance! Let it break down!", these sad armchair theorists would never make good entrepreneurs. Letting it break down involves direct costs - fixing the problem post-crash is much more expensive than preventative maintenance, in the same way that changing the oil is cheaper than replacing a broken crankshaft. They also have to pay off damages to those injured. Last, and most important, once reputation is damaged, ridership numbers and revenues will fall. The surest way to destroy one's business is to try to take advantage of one's customers.

That said, people sometimes do make mistakes, even in an AnCap society.

I find it amusing that Reggie is unhappy in a roller coaster, but quite ready to take the wheel of an archaic marsbuggy.

I do find AI drivers to be quite believable. Google is already field-testing the concept, and making great progress. Give us a few decades more of technological innovation, and I expect "Car, Take me home." will become the norm.

macsnafu on March 11, 2011, 09:18:39 am
It was "keep your pants on" or "hold your horses" in my day.
"Hold your horses" I'm quite familiar with.  Even "Whoa, Nellie!"

Quote
If roller coasters often break down, they lose money. Where's the profit in that? Better to design a system which is reliable and cheap to operate.

As mentioned earlier, given the large capital investment, one wants to maximize the difference "revenues-costs". However much anti-capitalists may think that this translates to "Screw maintenance! Let it break down!", these sad armchair theorists would never make good entrepreneurs. Letting it break down involves direct costs - fixing the problem post-crash is much more expensive than preventative maintenance, in the same way that changing the oil is cheaper than replacing a broken crankshaft. They also have to pay off damages to those injured. Last, and most important, once reputation is damaged, ridership numbers and revenues will fall. The surest way to destroy one's business is to try to take advantage of one's customers.
Excellent point.  Preventative maintenance usually is cheaper, although accidents, while less likely, could still happen.
Quote
I find it amusing that Reggie is unhappy in a roller coaster, but quite ready to take the wheel of an archaic marsbuggy.
Some people are just more comfortable when they are in control of the conveyance.  This could be a sticking point in the relationship between Reggie and Babbette, but maybe not, if she likes being taken for a ride.
Quote
I do find AI drivers to be quite believable. Google is already field-testing the concept, and making great progress. Give us a few decades more of technological innovation, and I expect "Car, Take me home." will become the norm.
Especially if they've had one too many.  It can't be considered drunk driving if the car is doing the driving, after all.
I love mankind.  It's PEOPLE I can't stand!  - Linus Van Pelt.

spudit on March 11, 2011, 10:07:06 am
Thanks for bringing back the Dymaxion Car, good olde Bucky tech.

They made what, 2 or 3 of them. One got wrecked and I saw one in a museum maybe 30 years ago. Now is there a Dymaxion bathroom aboard too?
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J Thomas on March 11, 2011, 11:09:49 am

If roller coasters often break down, they lose money. Where's the profit in that? Better to design a system which is reliable and cheap to operate.

I have a nephew who really likes roller coasters, and often I am the only one who will go with him. So I've seen a little bit about them.

He sits beside me and screams. He says he likes being scared. Of course he doesn't really think it's dangerous, not like playing chicken hoping the other driver will stop.

While he screams I notice whatever I can of what's going on and how I feel about it. Roller coasters make regular clicking noises, and sometimes the clicks are a little bit irregular. Sometimes the car lurches just a little bit, or falls an inch or two. I think this is designed to give the impression that it is rickety and poorly constructed, so it will feel more dangerous.

We went to Disney World for him to do roller coasters. Nobody but me would do the Space Mountain with him. It looked all smooth and futuristic. But riding at the front of the car we could see the same oldfashioned dinky wooden-looking ties under the car between the rails. It made the same clicking noises -- except at one part going up I thought they had loudspeakers making extra loud clicking noises to enhance the experience. It did the same little lurches and falls, as if it was rickety and poorly constructed. I guess they didn't want to change a winning formula.

Of course they want roller coasters to be reliable. But I think they want to give the impression that they are not reliable, so riders will like them more.

spudit on March 11, 2011, 11:20:49 am
Didn't Disney have a little bit of an, oops, rider decapitation a while back?
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