GlennWatson on February 22, 2011, 04:54:13 pm
How do you know who much ice cream to buy?

spudit on February 22, 2011, 05:17:13 pm
I generally buy the cup shaped cones, easier on the old brain.
Or was that for CG?
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GlennWatson on February 22, 2011, 09:34:23 pm
Whoever.  I'm still trying to figure out how pie helps when figuring the correct amount of ice cream.

spudit on February 22, 2011, 09:50:17 pm
As I understand it the pie goes under the ice cream, the amount escapes me too, beyond lots.
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Holt on February 23, 2011, 04:14:57 am
Mostly because all the systems were in place by this point. Contrary to your beliefs this wouldn't mean that putting a load of anarchists in a new place would result in a functional society popping up. I highly doubt the majority of Belgians are anything you'd call anarchists.

J Thomas on February 23, 2011, 08:53:11 am
How do you know who much ice cream to buy?

Buy as much ice cream as you intend to eat.

spudit on February 23, 2011, 11:12:04 am
Logic

Since Belguim is the part of Holland that stayed under Spanish control and so Catholic, and since the Dutch are well known dairy freaks, it only stands to reason that being essentially Dutch Catholic dairy freaks, Belguim must have some seriously kick ass good ice cream.

Logic

And a stalled government stuck in a ditch, too.

Spudit Like.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2011, 11:14:43 am by spudit »
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EchoMirage on February 23, 2011, 12:24:41 pm
from spudit:
Quote
A reference to the Belgian government thread since you are so physically close to Belguim,
do the Belgians make good ice cream?

Sorry, don't know belgium ice cream. But if their ice cream is just as half as good as their chocolate, then I recommend a try.
I just have an Opinion

And Opinions are like a..h....

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ZeissIkon on February 23, 2011, 12:34:35 pm
I had a teacher in elementary school who was teaching elementary geometry, and when we got to the part of calculating the volume of a cone, he said "we are going to skip this, you will never need to know it".  And you know, I never have needed to know how to calculate to volume of a cone.

This is sad, only because it literally took me less than a minute to learn how to calculate the volume of a cone (this is a right, circular cone, but I couldn't swear it's more complex for a non-right circular cone): it's 1/3 the volume of a cylinder the same base and height (which is base area times height, and base area is just the old circle formula, pi*r2).  That simple.  I learned it by overhearing the eighth graders trying to learn it while I was in fifth grade (two classrooms for eight grades where I went from 2-8), and it's stuck for the past forty-plus years, despite using it every couple years or less.

quadibloc on February 23, 2011, 04:07:28 pm
This is sad,
The way I remember it is that the volume of a pyramid is 1/3 of the height times the base. And the same rule, incidentally, applies to cones, which makes sense, as it applies to octagonal, hexagonal, and pentagonal pyramids, for example, as well as to square ones.

Still, it's just memorization, which is awkward.

After having learned calculus, though, one gains the ability to derive the formula - at least for the square pyramid.

The derivative of x to the n-th power, with respect to x, is n times x to the (n-1)-th power. A very important formula to remember, because it has lots of uses.

The antiderivative, or the integral, reverses this rule (except for 1/x, whose antiderivative is the natural logarithm of x; this happens because it would be 0/0 otherwise).

So if something falls at an acceleration of 32 feet per second squared, not only do we know the obvious fact that its velocity at time t from being let go will be t times 32 feet per second, but we also know that its position will be t squared times 16 feet. (Derivative of 16 t squared is 2 times 16 t.)

Apply that to a square pyramid whose height is the same as the sides of its base. So the derivative of its volume, as we go down from the tip, is the area of its base, h squared. As the derivative of h cubed is 3 times h squared, the integral of h squared is 1/3 h cubed.

KBCraig on February 24, 2011, 02:34:23 am
The way I remember it is that the volume of a pyramid is 1/3 of the height times the base. And the same rule, incidentally, applies to cones, which makes sense, as it applies to octagonal, hexagonal, and pentagonal pyramids, for example, as well as to square ones.

Still, it's just memorization, which is awkward.

Not all memorization is awkward. Much of it is instinctive. And any time we remember a solution, it's because we've memorized it. Having to stop and figure out a solution every time, now that's awkward!



Quote
After having learned calculus, though, one gains the ability to derive the formula - at least for the square pyramid.

The derivative of x to the n-th power, with respect to x, is n times x to the (n-1)-th power. A very important formula to remember, because it has lots of uses.

The antiderivative, or the integral, reverses this rule (except for 1/x, whose antiderivative is the natural logarithm of x; this happens because it would be 0/0 otherwise).

So if something falls at an acceleration of 32 feet per second squared, not only do we know the obvious fact that its velocity at time t from being let go will be t times 32 feet per second, but we also know that its position will be t squared times 16 feet. (Derivative of 16 t squared is 2 times 16 t.)

Apply that to a square pyramid whose height is the same as the sides of its base. So the derivative of its volume, as we go down from the tip, is the area of its base, h squared. As the derivative of h cubed is 3 times h squared, the integral of h squared is 1/3 h cubed.

Sounds like you memorized a helluva lot more than "one third of a cylinder", there.  ;)

spudit on February 24, 2011, 10:18:31 am
See, that's why I buy the cylindrical cup shaped cones for my ice cream, less math.
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dolo724 on March 21, 2011, 12:14:54 pm
Belgians celebrate 249 days without a government

http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Belgians-celebrate-249-days-without-government/ss/events/ts/021711belgiumgov

Apparently government is not something that a Belgian uses every day.


I think this is the best place to show yet another opinion.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1804/1

Don't know enough about history, etc, but like the talk.

macsnafu on March 21, 2011, 01:41:16 pm
Is there enough ice cream to cover the spam?  That's the real question, I think...
I love mankind.  It's PEOPLE I can't stand!  - Linus Van Pelt.

spudit on March 21, 2011, 01:58:41 pm
I have somewhere in storage a Hagar the Horrible comic in which someone  asks what he is dunking in his beer. Angel food cake. Shudder, Wow you really ARE a barbarian.

An example to us all.
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