paddyfool on December 31, 2010, 05:48:29 am
I look like an utter idiot in hats, due to having an oversized (top 1%) head and hence the hats themselves either have to be comically oversized or overstretched.   I therefore only wear the appropriate hats for hiking, skiing, cycling etc. and otherwise abjure them.

If other people look good in hats, however, they're welcome to them.

SandySandfort on December 31, 2010, 08:58:11 am
I wear my wide-brimmed fedora as a protest against a society that thinks hats are silly (and I measure it in inches dammit! ;D )

Actually, hats sizes in the US, and historically in English speaking countries, are measured in inches... sort of. Hat sizes in the US are their circumference divided by pi. So if your head is 22 inches, your hat size is 7. And don't get me started about shoe sizes and barleycorns...

KBCraig on December 31, 2010, 12:24:01 pm
Now we know Ed moved to the belt from the Texas sector, which should be explanation enough for the cowboy hat.

terry_freeman on December 31, 2010, 12:30:26 pm
Now we know Ed moved to the belt from the Texas sector, which should be explanation enough for the cowboy hat.

Yes! But how many cattle does he have?

 ;D

ZeissIkon on December 31, 2010, 01:51:36 pm
Now we know Ed moved to the belt from the Texas sector, which should be explanation enough for the cowboy hat.

Yes! But how many cattle does he have?

 ;D

Fortunately, cattle ownership was never a criterion for owning a Stetson (or any other ten-gallon or other size wild-west hat style), else Stetson would have gone out of business within months of offering the iconic wide-brim style.  For someone who wants to identify as Texan when millions of miles from Dallas, however, it might well be virtually mandatory...

wdg3rd on December 31, 2010, 09:54:14 pm
For me, a hat is a statement of personal identity and the one to your left is my favorite, acquired about a decade back at a place in Manitou Springs.  It's not particularly practical in New Jersey, be it summer or winter.  Then again, neither are a foot or more of beard and two feet or more of hair (both of which are growing back).

Aside from the accumulation of baseball-type hats many of us pile up over the years (and I haven't played baseball since high school phys-ed classes too many decades ago, nor watched a game since about then -- I find team sports boring) I do own one practical foul-weather hat that is generally mocked when I wear it.  It's a deer-stalker and Basil Rathbone never displayed it in it's foul weather mode, in which the flaps come down to cover the eats when it's cold or wet.  The bill in front keeps rain out of the eyes and the one in back keeps rain from going down the back of your neck.  (In the few Strand Magazine illustrations picturing Sherlock Holmes wearing a deer-stalker rather than some other style of hat, he's generally wearing other foul-weather clothing as well).
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Plane on January 01, 2011, 03:08:24 am
http://www.trueswords.com/extreme-black-self-defense-p-4953.html


If the hat has a second use , it may not be obvious.

Could you hide a lot of computeing power in a ten gallon hat?
A tanglenet server base?


This thing might be helping him play cards by houseing a sensor package that marks small flaws on the cards , every deck would become marked cards if the sensors and computeing power was strong enough.

J Thomas on January 01, 2011, 07:50:35 am

Could you hide a lot of computeing power in a ten gallon hat?
A tanglenet server base?


This thing might be helping him play cards by houseing a sensor package that marks small flaws on the cards , every deck would become marked cards if the sensors and computeing power was strong enough.

That's a good point. And would it be cheating? If you don't mark the cards, but merely observe marks that are already there....

I'd argue that it's cheating. If somebody else marks a deck and you play along and read the deck even though you didn't mark it, and everybody but the two of you has a giant disadvantage, aren't you cheating even if you weren't the one who marked the deck?

If every deck is a marked deck for you, but you don't warn the other players? And yet, what kind of warnings are appropriate? "Before we start, I ought to tell you that I have X-ray eyes and I can see all your cards." "Before we start, I should tell you that I am an expert at statistics." "Before we start, I should tell you that I was the best poker player on Mars when I left there." It isn't cheating to be good at poker or to know statistics, is it cheating if you can read the cards and the other players don't know you can? What if you have a computer under your hat that computes the odds for you?

I say there are rules, and then there's technique. And probably the players mostly agree about which is which, but with new technology they might not always agree.

People who can read all cards provides an argument for using an electronic deck, provided you trust the people who provide the electronics.

terry_freeman on January 01, 2011, 11:09:57 am
There is a saying in Texas: "All hat and no cattle."

Plane on January 01, 2011, 04:34:35 pm

Could you hide a lot of computeing power in a ten gallon hat?

That's a good point. And would it be cheating? If you don't mark the cards, but merely observe marks that are already there....

I'd argue that it's cheating.


I like your answer, this brings "cheating" or not into the relm of personal integrety where it really belongs , if you thought you were being cheated you might not ever figure out how it was being done but you would quit the game anyway because you wouldn't trust it anymore .

There is heavy forshadowing in this tale now , I expect this Texan of being a hero in the story so his hat won't be a cheating device , or a hidden weapon or a folded spacesuit. It is just an expression of ethnic origin, precious to those far from home.

I was in Djbouti once, (I was a sailor) and one of my shipmates was offered a trade of hats by a French Foreign Legionaire. Now the FFL hat is very distinctive , but looks about as hansome as a paper cup. My shipmate was from Arizona and his stetson was covered in silver conchos and decorations , it must have cost more than the Legionaires whole wardrobe, includeing the dress uniform.

 No trade was made, but tenstion was defused by buying a beer instead. I don't know who takes headgear more seriously than a cowboy far from home.

SandySandfort on January 01, 2011, 06:09:10 pm
There is heavy forshadowing in this tale now , I expect this Texan of being a hero in the story so his hat won't be a cheating device , or a hidden weapon or a folded spacesuit. It is just an expression of ethnic origin, precious to those far from home.

Why wouldn't a hero have a hat that contains a hidden weapon or a "folding spacesuit"? He could still be an expression of ethnic origin or personal preference.

BTW, why does everyone seem to assume:

cowboy hat = guy from Texas  ?

Yes, our guy is from Texas, but they are not the only ones who wear cowboy hats. Cowboy hats are widely warn everywhere from the Midwest, to the Southwest to the Northwest. Canadians in the prairie provinces wear them, Mexicans wear them. The vaqueros in Argentina and Uruguay wear them, Country-Western bands in Malaysia wear them.

Plane on January 01, 2011, 06:28:50 pm
There is heavy forshadowing in this tale now , I expect this Texan of being a hero in the story so his hat won't be a cheating device , or a hidden weapon or a folded spacesuit. It is just an expression of ethnic origin, precious to those far from home.

Why wouldn't a hero have a hat that contains a hidden weapon or a "folding spacesuit"? He could still be an expression of ethnic origin or personal preference.

BTW, why does everyone seem to assume:

cowboy hat = guy from Texas  ?

Yes, our guy is from Texas, but they are not the only ones who wear cowboy hats. Cowboy hats are widely warn everywhere from the Midwest, to the Southwest to the Northwest. Canadians in the prairie provinces wear them, Mexicans wear them. The vaqueros in Argentina and Uruguay wear them, Country-Western bands in Malaysia wear them.
Don't assume my assumptions, the cartoon caricter states in his dialog that he is from Texas and in the color commentary I wrote with I referenced a Hat owner I knew from Arizona , his "cowboy" attire was important to his identity even though his actual job at the time was as a USN sailor.

So is a folding spacesuit in his hat a spoiler?

GlennWatson on January 03, 2011, 07:01:25 am
If he had the natural skill of telling when a card was marked that would be ok, but if he used artificial means like a computer or scanner that would be cheating, IMO.

terry_freeman on January 03, 2011, 08:22:44 am
If he had the natural skill of telling when a card was marked that would be ok, but if he used artificial means like a computer or scanner that would be cheating, IMO.

Suppose I had such a "natural skill", but required glasses to correct my natural near-sightedness? Where do we draw the line on "artificial means"?

In some arcs, EFT posits implanted computers and optics - they need not be concealed in a hat. If I had such a computer, it would scan faces, remember them, and attach names and other pertinent data. Why not scan the backs of cards and remember their values?

It is already the custom in Earth casinos to use multiple decks and to replace decks frequently; if such scan-and-detect technology becomes readily available, then counters will be devised; switching among multiple decks will be common; calls for a new deck will be frequent.

Here's another possibility: e-ink is becoming cheaper and more prevalent. What if playing cards have e-ink - not on the front, but the back - and periodically change the appearance of their backs?

quadibloc on January 03, 2011, 01:20:44 pm
The backs of cards are intended to be identical, and not a means of determining what is on their fronts. So I have no problem with treating the use of marked cards, even by passive means, as cheating.

However, in Canada, people have been convicted of cheating - rather than merely thrown out of casinos - for card counting at blackjack. That is going too far, because that clearly is merely skillful play, remembering what cards have gone before.