Holt on January 01, 2011, 05:46:39 pm
The artificial organs one. The scaffold wouldn't interfere with the organs function anyway as the scaffold is taken from an organ by removing all the currently living cells from it. You effectively take a useless example of the organ, strip the cells and apply new ones to the sanitised scaffold.


This is present tecnology , but this still requires a donor organ doesn't it?  With all of the liveing cells removed what is left ? a sac of organic connective tissues?


What if you could cast an aerogell scaffold and infuse it with appropriately hormone triggered cells of the recipient?


The materiel would have to be appropriate to the use , but whatever it was it could be very lightweight it it was in low gravity.


The scaffolds might be made in a 3d printer , especially if the result didn't need the structural strength to support its own weight. Organs might become availible and cheap enough to make extreme lifespans ordinary.

We may well be able to print the scaffolds in gravity. I'm not sure it's something that would benefit enough from microgravity to make it worth the effort.

Plane on January 01, 2011, 07:05:50 pm
The artificial organs one. The scaffold wouldn't interfere with the organs function anyway as the scaffold is taken from an organ by removing all the currently living cells from it. You effectively take a useless example of the organ, strip the cells and apply new ones to the sanitised scaffold.


This is present tecnology , but this still requires a donor organ doesn't it?  With all of the liveing cells removed what is left ? a sac of organic connective tissues?


What if you could cast an aerogell scaffold and infuse it with appropriately hormone triggered cells of the recipient?


The materiel would have to be appropriate to the use , but whatever it was it could be very lightweight it it was in low gravity.


The scaffolds might be made in a 3d printer , especially if the result didn't need the structural strength to support its own weight. Organs might become availible and cheap enough to make extreme lifespans ordinary.

We may well be able to print the scaffolds in gravity. I'm not sure it's something that would benefit enough from microgravity to make it worth the effort.


I am not certain either, but I would love to be the guy that came up with the idea that makes trips into space financially rewarding.

Research into replacement organ manufacture will continue if I ignore it , I am not worried, but there is a wisdom in  a large number of people , like parrellel processors , brainstorming can winnow a huge number of ideas and sometimes a combination of silly ideas turns into a practical winner.

There is a large barrier to makeing a profit in space and only a few uses have passed this barrier, this is the expense of lifting mass out of Earths gravity well. If an asteroid of pure gold weighing seven thousand pounds were to fall into the sun , passing within easy observation of Earth , it would not pay you right now to go get it or any part of it, it costs more per pound to match speeds with an asteroid from the Earth than gold is worth per pound.

There are things worth a lot more pound for pound than gold , replacement organs are one of these. but as you say I am NOT sure that zero G would make them better. I just would like to find something .

 

anything