Is indenturing/enslaving people right ?

Hell YEAH
6 (40%)
HELL NO
9 (60%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Bob G on December 07, 2010, 02:30:45 am
There was the overthrow of Batista in Cuba. The overthrow of the Shah in Iran. The overthrow of Noriega in the Philippines. The overthrow of Somoza in Nicaragua. And a large handful of other examples.

Not political revolutions, J, slave revolts. Like Spartacus, Nat Turner, the Amistad mutiny. (Two out of three of which ultimately ended up badly for the slaves in question.)
« Last Edit: December 07, 2010, 02:32:46 am by Bob G »
Whatsoever, for any cause, seeketh to take or give
  Power above or beyond the Laws, suffer it not to live.
Holy State, or Holy King, or Holy People's Will.
  Have no truck with the senseless thing, order the guns and kill.

The penultimate stanza of Rudyard Kipling's MacDonough's Song

J Thomas on December 07, 2010, 09:51:46 am
There was the overthrow of Batista in Cuba. The overthrow of the Shah in Iran. The overthrow of Noriega in the Philippines. The overthrow of Somoza in Nicaragua. And a large handful of other examples.

Not political revolutions, J, slave revolts. Like Spartacus, Nat Turner, the Amistad mutiny. (Two out of three of which ultimately ended up badly for the slaves in question.)

Haiti was both, right? The slaves revolted and took over the government. How else can a slave revolt succeed?

You can argue that the cubans and the nicaraguans and the filipinos weren't slaves. I guess there's a fine shading of meaning there. They mostly didn't have private masters, but there was somebody who could do whatever he wanted with them and they had no recourse. You could argue that they still weren't nations of slaves. You could make that argument. But then aren't we left with only one single example in the last few hundred years where the slaves won?

sams on December 07, 2010, 11:16:04 am
The unsavory characters might rise up against you.

You'll notice that slave rebellions have varied in effectiveness through the centuries. The closer we get to the modern era the less effective they have been overall.

There was the overthrow of Batista in Cuba. The overthrow of the Shah in Iran. The overthrow of Noriega in the Philippines. The overthrow of Somoza in Nicaragua. And a large handful of other examples.

How many slave rebellions succeeded in the old days? There was Haiti. Were there others?


First Batista was succeeded by Fidel Castro who's people is so ''free'' that they don't have the right to escape from the country  ::)

Kind of weird that the only society on earth which looks like Slavery is North Korea and revolt is not possible there

quadibloc on December 07, 2010, 05:12:48 pm
I suspect that on the Earth of the United Worlds, one of the forms of entertainment banned as a corrupting influence is the Western. Morris would have known that his plan is not a good idea in the Belt.

J Thomas on December 07, 2010, 08:17:23 pm
The unsavory characters might rise up against you.

You'll notice that slave rebellions have varied in effectiveness through the centuries. The closer we get to the modern era the less effective they have been overall.

There was the overthrow of Batista in Cuba. The overthrow of the Shah in Iran. The overthrow of Noriega in the Philippines. The overthrow of Somoza in Nicaragua. And a large handful of other examples.

How many slave rebellions succeeded in the old days? There was Haiti. Were there others?


First Batista was succeeded by Fidel Castro who's people is so ''free'' that they don't have the right to escape from the country  ::)

Yes, and Haiti didn't do all that well after they threw out the slavers either. Not to say they would have done better as slaves.

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Kind of weird that the only society on earth which looks like Slavery is North Korea and revolt is not possible there

I don't know whether revolt is possible there. I won't find out unless it happens.

Plane on December 08, 2010, 12:43:49 am
Quote
BBQPidgey....


Between the time that Moses led and the time that kings arose Was there a time of anarcy in Isreal?

Two or three generations in which government was very local and there was no king?

Some of these scriptures seem to indicate that Anarcy was the  governmental form preferred by the Lord, but that the people clamored and prayed to have a king.

jamesd on December 08, 2010, 09:27:50 pm
Haiti was both, right? The slaves revolted and took over the government. How else can a slave revolt succeed?

In practice, slave revolts generally succeed in a less dramatic manner, in that slave owning becomes more dangerous and less popular, and it gets a lot easier for slaves to earn their freedom.

Recall that the revolting slaves in Haiti were looking for a compromise that would have left whites in charge of the government and in possession of their non human property, and instead things went to hell because the whites failed to compromise.  The slaves were not seeking a total victory, but instead blundered into total victory unintentionally, and with quite disastrous consequences.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2010, 02:46:02 am by jamesd »

Azure Priest on December 21, 2010, 07:40:27 am

Kind of weird that the only society on earth which looks like Slavery is North Korea.

Nope. Kenya, Sudan, Syria and various African countries still practice slavery. The form is this, the "right" religion moves into a village, kills the men, rapes then kills the women, and takes the children away as loot. Ironically many of these nations are on the "human rights" council of the UN.

terry_freeman on December 22, 2010, 05:15:09 am

Kind of weird that the only society on earth which looks like Slavery is North Korea.

Nope. Kenya, Sudan, Syria and various African countries still practice slavery. The form is this, the "right" religion moves into a village, kills the men, rapes then kills the women, and takes the children away as loot. Ironically many of these nations are on the "human rights" council of the UN.

That's an example of regulatory capture, of course. What better place for a fox than "coop, administration of"?