wdg3rd on February 13, 2010, 04:55:23 pm
Just like the Mayflower.  The colony started out Collectivist and nearly staved to death.  After the collectivist Mayflower Compact was thrown out , people began working in their own best interest.  With implied self interest and the profit motive firmly entrenched, the colony succeeded.   :)


My ancestor was on the second boat (that aimed for Massachusetts and got there, rather than aiming for Virginia and missing "by this much").

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Just look what we've done with all that hard work and sacrifice.   ::)

I didn't do it.

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I define the nanny minded as those who will not risk their lives or anything else important to them.  They fear the possibility of catastrophic failure and what they might lose.  They value lack of risk and personal safety.  They transfer their fear to others.  If they can not risk catastrophic failure, how can someone else?  They see their fear as reasonable.  They see people who strive and risk, as someone who must be protected from themselves.   At the same time they have an overriding desire for power.  Power used to impose their fears on others.  Power used to control others, trying to make them as small minded as the controllers.  Nanny minded fear someone who despite restrictions and controls, succeeds.  The last thing they want to do is to see themselves as they are.

People died and will continue to die while getting things done.  I'll lay a bet that each of us have successes we value most for what we risked.  I'll also bet we failed at least once, before we succeeded.  That's the way it should be.

I've failed several times.  My next success/failure is a restaurant up in New Hampshire.  Ask El Neil if my chili is a possible success (and the last time he, Cathy and Rylla ate it, I was great but not nearly as good as I am now -- a decade of practice [and a gagload of feedback, like prize money] does help). 

Ward

What have you done lately?  Whether for others or more importantly for yourself?
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

dough560 on February 15, 2010, 04:26:47 am
According to one of my sister-in-laws, one of our ancestors was a cobbler on the Mayflower.  Interesting if true. But knowing my sister-in-law, a large grain of salt should be applied.

I'm 11 years into my third career and working on a fourth with a couple of friends to develop and market several products related to firearms and gaming systems.  I bring up ideas and they poked holes in them.  We work to patch the holes and make the systems function smoothly.  We're getting there, but it's taking time.

In the mean time I'm raising two daughters and getting ready to do some home remodeling.

What's the name of the restaurant and where is it?  Used to get up that way when I drove semi's.

I didn't do it either, and  don't like the results.  I really don't like what those results could mean for my kids.

wdg3rd on February 15, 2010, 05:50:54 pm

What's the name of the restaurant and where is it?  Used to get up that way when I drove semi's.


The planned name for the restaurant (and it'll be at least a year or two before opening) is simply "Fire!".  Two reasons.  One is that chili is considered a fairly spicy foodstuff in some circles.  The other is that there will be a standard 10% discount to anyone carrying an effective means of self-defense (which does not include certificates from Tiger Schulman's Karate School).  That includes cops -- they don't get the 50% discount I recall from my time as a cadet with the Laconia PD, a cop is just another armed civilian, whether he thinks so or not.

Planned location is Tilton, convenient to I-93.  Would have preferred Laconia, but Laconia is 10 miles from I-93 access, whether north to Meredith of south to Tilton.  I want to be able to catch the summer tourists on their way to the lakes and the winter tourists on their way to the slopes, and the hunters in the fall, and the NASCAR fans in racing season and the bikers during their week (which has stretched to more than two weeks in recent years).

All test runs I've made at FSP Porcfests have been great successes.  Funny, it tends to be the New Hampshire natives who say it could use a bit hotter seasoning while visitors from places like Texas and Louisiana (this included Michael Badnarik one year) don't say anything, they just wolf it down.  Back in my teens in Laconia, New Hampshire cuisine was famous for being bland (though the word "subtle" was often used).  My maternal grandmother (the one whose ancestor settled in Plymouth MA) only knew of two seasonings for savory foods, and those were salt and pre-ground black pepper.  A great cook despite that limitation (and a fine baker, a branch of bio-chemical engineering I've never mastered -- cornbread is my limit on that front, so it's a good thing it goes well with chili).

Back in the early 70s, pizza was about as ethnic as food got in Laconia (though the Grand Union market did carry some Old El Paso brand products).  Nowadays, there's a (small, but damned good food) Thai restaurant next-door to the high school.  (Hmm, no drool icon).

The decor theme for my place will be Texican-revolution era San Antonio, a town later considered the birthplace of chili as we know it.  Hopefully, after a couple of years of obscene profits, the first major redecoration (and expansion), I'll be able to hire Scott to do some artwork for the place (the stuff I use at first will probably be based on movies, mainly the one with Mike Morrison as former congressman Crockett).  Hopefully, that redecoration will include a basement pistol range (no, I'm not willing to buy and dig under enough land to have a basement rifle range -- and trap shooting is right out).

Oh, yeah.  No "purely" decorative plants in the place (I'm not a big fan of flowers, unless they produce edible fruit or are edible on their own, like squash flowers).  I won't plant anything I can't eat.  Chile bushes have their own special beauty.  So do tomato and tomatillo vines and bushes, as well as cilantro, mexican oregano (not related to the mediterranean variety, but works better in chili) and comino.  Really hot chiles don't grow well outdoors in New Hampshire's short season (moderate hot chiles don't do spectacular even down here in Jersey unless you have a greenhouse, and that would violate zoning in this sorry-ass town -- I don't know of any municipality in New Hampshire that discourages greenhouses, but I haven't been everywhere.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2010, 06:21:12 pm by wdg3rd »
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

terry_freeman on February 15, 2010, 11:04:12 pm
Good luck with the chili venture - and I totally love the 10% discount for effective means of self-defense.

Just read a book - I think it was Molon Labe! - where the Wyoming legislature decides to exempt anyone openly carrying a firearm from sales tax. The measure was designed partly to encourage open carry and reduce crime, but also to discourage hoplophobes from moving in.

dough560 on February 16, 2010, 04:02:12 am
w d g 3 r d.  Sounds like my kind of place.  I'd like to get my wife up to speed so we could take Massad Ayoob's school together.  We get up that way and I'll definitely stop .  She is so going to kick my rear. 

A local gun-shop has a 100 yard rifle range in the basement.  Unfortunately it's currently inoperative.  Too many customers kept shooting the support beams in the ceiling.  Then some jerk used AP Ammunition and really messed up the deflection plates and destroyed several of the mounting brackets.  Unfortunately the owner is in the VA Home in  Cleveland, Ohio.  The store is leased to a couple of pretty good guys and there is an empty building on the property that used to be restaurant.

I believe the place was built back in the 1950's.  Back then their neighbors were the village proper, a stock car track and commercial party/picnic setup.  The track and picnic place are a housing development and the range and restaurant are surrounded by high dollar homes.  The village council tried to close them down as an undesirable business, but the local court had already decided that issue when a local trap club  was sued for noise pollution by their new neighbors.  The judge at the time asked if the home owners knew the trap club was there when they built their homes.  They said yes and he issued a ruling protecting the trap club.  This ruling carried over to the gun-shop and range.  Both facilities, in a effort to get along with their new neighbors have either changed their hours or in the case of the shop no longer allow magnum level loads in the pistol range which is located above ground.

At one time the owner offered to sell me the ranges, shop and restaurant.  I couldn't raise the financing I'd have needed, but I still wish and wonder what might have been.  Good luck with your dream.  They make life worth living.   

wdg3rd on February 16, 2010, 11:00:47 pm
Good luck with the chili venture - and I totally love the 10% discount for effective means of self-defense.

Just read a book - I think it was Molon Labe! - where the Wyoming legislature decides to exempt anyone openly carrying a firearm from sales tax. The measure was designed partly to encourage open carry and reduce crime, but also to discourage hoplophobes from moving in.

Know the book well (and despise what he said about the FSP in it, he who publicly became the 5000th member [for the vote] and has since been an asshole.  Boston taught shooting courses at several Liberty Round Table conclaves (which is where I first started doing large batches of chili for anarchists -- the second Conclave at Rocky Mountain National Park above Estes Colorado is where El Neil (and his beautiful wife and daughter [I think Rylla was maybe nine years old]) ate my chili.  (I made two pots, one for men [highly spiced] and one for women and kids [less highly spiced], but the brats (Rylla, Lobo's kids, Greg's kids) ate the hot stuff, leaving me [the cook eats last] with the bland stuff and a jar of habanero powder).  (I stopped making two batches after that -- and that may be why Boston doesn't like me, as he doesn't deal well with hot spices, and he started coming to the LRT Conclaves a year or two later).  I miss the LRT Conclaves, but I try to make up the difference at Porcfest (I missed last year--  medical situation -- but I'll be there this year).  New Hampshire is a nice place, and I don't just say that because I have several centuries of ancestors (on my mother's side) buried there.  I did my first New Hampshire winter after fifteen years in Los Angeles (straight from an L.A. summer to a NH winter, way back in 1970 -- from 110 degreesF in LA to negative 33F -- I'll admit I didn't go outside that night, the coldest I ever spent outside was only -19F, with a 30mph wind from across the lake, and as a pump jockey I couldn't stay indoors -- brrr doesn't only refer to Griswold's).
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

dough560 on February 17, 2010, 03:05:14 am
Central Ohio can be bad enough, but Fort Harrison, on the Northeast corner of Indianapolis in the winter has to be experienced to be believed.  We directed traffic in front of the Army's Finance Center (where all the checks are issued).  Temperatures would be below zero and chill factors would be around 50 and 60 degrees below zero.  Full arctic gear including the face mask, a fifteen minute time limit for exposure to conditions, and we still had people with cold injuries.

Rocketman on February 17, 2010, 09:11:27 am
Dough: I live about 35-40 miles north of where you describe and I can vouch for that.  We had one really bad year, I think it was 1977, where one Janurary night it got down to -62F including the wind chill.  Even the police and fire were not on the road that night because if their car stalled out they would freeze to death before help could arrive.  Absolutely nothing was moving that night.
I remember coming back from W. Palm Beach Florida for Christmas vacation in 1984 I think.  When I left WPB it was around 75F or so.  When I got into Indianapolis International about 3 hours later it was -10F.  My body damn near went into shock.  I was wearing the warmest coat that I had taken to WPB and it was no where near warm enough.  My teeth were chattering and the fluid in my eyes were freezing.  I NEVER want to go through anything like that ever again!   :o

dough560 on February 18, 2010, 08:52:55 am
Believe me, I understand.  Makes the weather we're getting now, look almost balmy.  I spent the winter of 76/77 at Fort Monroe, Va, watching the Chesapeake Bay freeze over with Ice twenty plus feet thick. Ice breakers were brought in to keep the Norfolk Naval Base open.  I don't remember being as cold there as I was in Ft. Harrison.