ObscureDragom on October 23, 2009, 01:46:03 am
The hallucinations don't have to be induced by anything other then the stated conditions of lab for it to be murder.

The Martian song can be an actual signal, and almost be irrelevant to the facts.

People mentally damaged by a decaday of isolation would prove to be less willing to stand up and tell people that there are aliens, being unable to bear the thought of being the center of attention for a crowd.  They would seam less competent and believable.  If they encountered the Martian song anywhere else they would most likely conclude it was simply a flashback or remnant rather then something that is real.

And everyone else would know that their are no aliens because all those SETI researchers haven't found anything.

In fact sending everyone who wants to find out if aliens exist to a remote lab like that would be the best way to silence them and keep the whole thing under wraps.

Or the signal could be human in nature and it could be a weird 1984 double think, breaking the spirits of the young and idealistic to preserve the status quo, kind of thing.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2009, 02:05:48 am by ObscureDragom »

quadibloc on October 23, 2009, 08:32:31 am
So far, I've seen nothing to contradict what seemed plausible earlier; that some hallucinogen is being administered to the people in the station. I presume that the "Martian music" is a real phenomenon, which happened first, and somehow it was perceived as an opportunity by the villain.

But there are other possibilities. For example, LSD was derived from ergot, a natural fungal infection of rye. So it could be simply that, because of the facility's isolation, it is reliant on shipments of food that are too infrequent, food that is stored for too long.

Or we could have real aliens whose body odor is hallucinogenic, but somehow I don't see this comic going there.

Meanwhile, we now have an interesting backstory for Reggie.

SandySandfort on October 23, 2009, 01:08:42 pm
I've been wondering about the nanites.
We lack this technology, so this is speculation.
Three possibilities present themselves.
The nanites, programmed to interact at some basic level constantly, are acting up due to unexpected system isolation.  They don't even have a ships com, or a suits transponder to ping.  The result could be sensory hallucinations triggered, but not dictated by, the nanites...

Damn, I wish I had thought of that. That is very clever and original (also wrong, but that's just because I didn't think of it).

ObscureDragom on November 02, 2009, 03:52:45 am
Leaving early?

"Oh, a definition of God that doesn't involve looking through a telescope?  Back to work!"

But seriously to escape with his current supply of sanity he does have to make a phone call...

The real test will be if the hallucinations fade for a few hours after the call is made.

SandySandfort on November 02, 2009, 02:52:19 pm
The real test will be if the hallucinations fade for a few hours after the call is made.

Will the hallucination fade away or is Reggie doomed to live the rest of his life with delusional dopplegangers and monsters from the id? Don't miss the next exciting episode of    ESCAPE    FROM    TERRA!!!

KBCraig on November 03, 2009, 01:46:37 am
The real test will be if the hallucinations fade for a few hours after the call is made.

Will the hallucination fade away or is Reggie doomed to live the rest of his life with delusional dopplegangers and monsters from the id? Don't miss the next exciting episode of    ESCAPE    FROM    TERRA!!!

"Hello, Jot-Em-Down Store!"


ObscureDragom on November 04, 2009, 12:13:46 am
Go lingering effects! go!

So what about the Swedish Student and the Grass Sandwich?

Scott on November 04, 2009, 03:15:02 pm
Quote
So what about the Swedish Student and the Grass Sandwich?

Google it.

ObscureDragom on November 06, 2009, 01:03:04 am
So the melody is real and the melody is just the wind?  I did not see that one coming.

Rocketman on November 06, 2009, 10:08:08 am
Read todays panel and I've got a question for Sandy.  Does the melody that the female sailor heard in the rigging come from a song that she heard maybe years ago and her subconsious mind stored away for future reference or did the song really come from the rigging with just a few minor variations that was the same as the ancient Polynesians heard centuries ago?  It would seem to me that your endorsing the latter, but I always thought that your subconsious mind was created from experiences that you personally had.  The experiences of a 19th century white woman would have to be enormously different than that of say an 6th century Polynesian wouldn't it?

SandySandfort on November 06, 2009, 12:16:55 pm
Read todays panel and I've got a question for Sandy.  Does the melody that the female sailor heard in the rigging come from a song that she heard maybe years ago and her subconsious mind stored away for future reference or did the song really come from the rigging with just a few minor variations that was the same as the ancient Polynesians heard centuries ago?  It would seem to me that your endorsing the latter, but I always thought that your subconsious mind was created from experiences that you personally had.  The experiences of a 19th century white woman would have to be enormously different than that of say an 6th century Polynesian wouldn't it?

Good questions. Unfortunately, I do not have good answers. When writing this arc, I did a lot of searching for related phenomena. Oliver Sacks had some intriguing stuff about music, mind and intelligence. I think I read the account of the woman sailing to Bora Bora in "latitude 38" out of the San Francisco Bay Area, but her experience was pretty much exactly what I wrote.

I don't know how our subconscious "fills in the spaces" to create the perception order, but I imagine that we all do it about the same way. I doubt it is cultural. Plus, music is just about the only thing universal among cultures. Of course, music does have mathematical rules for tone and time.

Some of the first-hand stories from sailors were just to bizarre to use, e.g., audio and video barking dogs, freight trains and fields of waving wheat. There were many accounts of voices and visual hallucinations of people. The human mind is a wonder.