SandySandfort on June 10, 2009, 09:54:08 am
This reminds me of a question I had earlier:  what are the economics of air (or more specifically, O2)?  There has been no mention of how the cost for this is borne, and I would expect there to be a cost, at minimum for transferring it from the poles (where I would presume most of it is generated via photosynthesis) and the common living/business areas.

After all, TANSTAAFB (There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Breath)  ;)
Actually, in a market economy, a lot of things are free (for some value of "free"). The most pervasive mass transit system in America is privately owned and almost entirely free. Anyone care to guess what that is? (Autographed postcard to the first correct answer.) Did you ever pay for parking or the air conditioning, lighting or music at a shopping mall? Lots of things are free when they serve as loss leaders for business.

In the particular case of Ceres, remember that there is oxygen in every direction; an ocean of it. Nobody buys O2, they take it out of the ice. In the case of the Ceres City retail area, the free oxygen is just a cost of doing business, borne by the Merchant's Association. City neighborhoods have owners' associations that charge a maintenance fee for air and other services. Individual families on seasteads extract their own.

SandySandfort on June 10, 2009, 10:22:22 am
And now, of course, the Guzmans really have no way of knowing what they're getting into. The killer is overhearing their plans... and we have a reference to Antoine de Saint-Euxpéry, if I'm not mistaken.

Yes, but not for any deep symbolic reason. Probably a whole slew of planetoids will be named that by settlers. In fact, some already are. There is an asteroid moon named, Petit-Prince, an asteroid designated 46610 Bésixdouze (which means "B-six-twelve," B612 being the number of the name of the Little Prince's asteroid) and there is an asteroid named 2578 Saint-Exupéry, the author of The Little Prince.


Sean Roach on June 10, 2009, 01:32:11 pm
The Disney monorail?

Edit.  I'm having a hard time reconciling my guess with the word "pervasive".  The Disney monorail only services a little spot in Florida.  Oh, well.  I'll leave this up and see what the answer turned out to be.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 01:43:16 pm by Sean Roach »

SandySandfort on June 10, 2009, 02:38:34 pm
The Disney monorail?

Edit.  I'm having a hard time reconciling my guess with the word "pervasive".  The Disney monorail only services a little spot in Florida.  Oh, well.  I'll leave this up and see what the answer turned out to be.

Every city in America. Pervasive.

Clue: it runs on rails.   ???

Brugle on June 11, 2009, 09:32:38 am
I seem to recall one of L. Neil's essays calling automobiles the best mass transit system ever.  But since most roads are not privately owned, I guess that's not what you meant.

Rails suggest elevators.

SandySandfort on June 11, 2009, 01:56:47 pm
I seem to recall one of L. Neil's essays calling automobiles the best mass transit system ever.  But since most roads are not privately owned, I guess that's not what you meant.

Rails suggest elevators.


BINGO! We have a winner! It certainly fits the criteria of mass transit and it usually is free (except for things like the ride to the top of the Empire State Building). However, I know that some of you are going to be pissing and moaning about it being unfair, so let the carping begin.  ;D

(Brugal, send me a message with your mailing address and I'll send you the signed EFT postcard.)

deadasdisco on June 14, 2009, 01:15:24 pm
Hmmm... another "accident" aimed at the FSM?  This sound familiar to anyone?  But how (if it does) does the mysterious (probably Tellurian) vendetta against the FSM relate to the Pale Man and the dead Smythe.  And what's really going on on the mysterious TLP Asteroid.  Tune in Next Week!  (Sorry, I got a love of old space serials and sci-fi adventure strips that gets the better of me sometimes..)

deliberatus on June 16, 2009, 05:58:37 pm
I look at it like this; the earth knows they have a problem, and need to establish a forward baase for efficency of operations. this means they need raw materials- and water provides oxygen, hydrogen, and as is serves as reaction mass. So the receiving agent shakes their hands at a primitive advanced base on a big rock, claiming big ore bodies and a new mining consoortiium.  the longer they keep it under wraps, the more they cn spend money on getting resources locally.

And of course, they are using existing merchant traffic to seed intel agents and sleeper saboteurs into the local belter population. Ayn Rand understood that they were sneaky and evil, but not stupid.

But they ARE paranoid and evil, and having cloaked ships can betray that this is more than a simple mining operation- and in this the plot thickens...

KBCraig on June 23, 2009, 02:23:09 am
It's obviously waaaay past time for Bert & Ernie to hit the emergency thrusters and GTFO of Dodge.

I will remain an entranced reader while they deal with the consequences of not following my advice.  ;)


Rocketman on June 23, 2009, 11:50:48 pm
You know, I was thinking that maybe the fighter pilot doesn't know about the other ship.  If he's really in the dark then maybe Bert and Ernie will get the blame for bringing it to the secret location.  All kinds of interesting possiblities.  ???

Colonel Healy on July 04, 2009, 06:27:56 am
I have really been enjoying the story thus far. A personal planetoid with relativly high gravity implies some truly advanced science, gravitational controll perhaps ?

On a side note I found an article in the Santa Fe New Mexican about a scientist @ Los Alamos who claims to be able to make radio waves go Faster Than Light.

It doesen't sound like quantum entanglement, but it does show that something like Tanglenet could be possible. 


Rocketman on July 04, 2009, 08:41:41 pm
Sounds a lot like the late Phillip "Taylor" Kramer, the former base player for the "Iron Butterfly".  After working on faster than light communication and claiming that he had made a breakthrough "mysteriously" disappeared in 1996.  That sparked a congressional investigation.  His remains were found in 1999.  He indicated that the secret was a special signal compression if I remember correctly.

deadasdisco on July 08, 2009, 08:47:06 am
Ya know, correcting for regional differances (I've never even been NEAR Hawai'i) Kobiyashi sounds a lot like the software guys I know, all the biggest shiniest toys and a near allergy to grown-up trappings.

Rocketman on July 08, 2009, 09:08:21 pm
When I saw the name the first thing that I thought of was the "Kobiyashi Maru".  That's a name that every "Star Trek TOS" fan knows well.  ;D