Where did the Turkey come from?

Historical Error
1 (50%)
The TIME WARP--Again
1 (50%)

Total Members Voted: 2

Daniel Jackson on March 27, 2009, 08:51:10 am
The banquet hall is stupendous.  The panel is both detailed and historically accurate EXCEPT for one small detail--the roast turkey.

Yep.  There it is.  A roast turkey on a platter being carried by two servants.

Turkeys are birds of the New World.   They were not introduced to Europe until the 17th Century.  The Dutch introduced the bird after learning of it from the original New Yorkers.  

Corydon on March 27, 2009, 01:14:23 pm
It could be a roast goose, of course.  I'm more concerned that its legs appear to be on backwards.  But I suppose in a world with cyclopes and so forth, the gods could have created a backwards-legged goose.  Or a turkey. 

(By the way, I'm curious why you say the banquet hall is "historically accurate."  Which historical period do you imagine is being represented here?)

wdg3rd on March 28, 2009, 12:40:47 pm
The banquet hall is stupendous.  The panel is both detailed and historically accurate EXCEPT for one small detail--the roast turkey.

Yep.  There it is.  A roast turkey on a platter being carried by two servants.

Turkeys are birds of the New World.   They were not introduced to Europe until the 17th Century.  The Dutch introduced the bird after learning of it from the original New Yorkers.  

Turkeys were introduced to Europe after the conquest of Mexico in the early 16th century.  Domestic turkeys currently on American tables are in fact descendants of those Mexican turkeys that were taken to Europe, not bred from the wild turkeys in what is now the northeastern US.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Scott on March 28, 2009, 05:10:39 pm
It's not a turkey, it's a kind of domesticated goose peculiar to the place that sort of looks like a backward-legged turkey when you roast it.

Yes.

wdg3rd on March 29, 2009, 12:25:32 pm
Cooked birds all tend to have the same shape, from hummingbird to squab to turkey to ostrich. In the "historical" period of the Trojan War and aftermath, there were even larger birds available, though generally just for local consumption in what is now New Zealand (the Moa) and Madagascar (the Elephant bird).

If California Condor McNuggets were on the market, that species would not be on the government dole.

Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

 

anything