Jackson on March 13, 2009, 06:27:50 pm
Just a random question; Whose face is on the Continental on page 20?
Also, are Continentals named after the money printed by the Continental Congress during the American Revolution?

SandySandfort on March 13, 2009, 07:13:41 pm
Just a random question; Whose face is on the Continental on page 20?
Also, are Continentals named after the money printed by the Continental Congress during the American Revolution?

I have forgotten whom Scott and Lee put on the bill (guys?), but the new Continental came about when the US dollar tanked and was replaced by a North American Union bill called the American Continental (I guess Amero just didn't fly). When the Euro collapsed it was replaced by the European Continental. And when the UW came into being it simply called its new funny money, the Continental.

wdg3rd on March 14, 2009, 07:06:56 am
Just a random question; Whose face is on the Continental on page 20?
Also, are Continentals named after the money printed by the Continental Congress during the American Revolution?

I have forgotten whom Scott and Lee put on the bill (guys?), but the new Continental came about when the US dollar tanked and was replaced by a North American Union bill called the American Continental (I guess Amero just didn't fly). When the Euro collapsed it was replaced by the European Continental. And when the UW came into being it simply called its new funny money, the Continental.

I would suspect that that the successor to to the Euro and the Dollar (and several other other fiat monies) would probably be called the InterContinental, shortened in parlance to Continental.

Whether Stalin or Proxmire is on the face of the bill, mox nix..
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Scott on March 14, 2009, 12:14:25 pm
The portrait on the Continental note is Dag Hammarskjold, who was U.N. Secretary General during the 1950s-60s. Didn't come out as clearly as I'd hoped.


Jackson on March 14, 2009, 12:20:14 pm
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Whether Stalin or Proxmire is on the face of the bill, mox nix..
Do you mean Bill Proxmire, the guy who created the Golden Fleece awards? What would he be doing on a UW bill?
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The portrait on the Continental note is Dag Hammarskjold, who was U.N. Secretary General during the 1950s-60s. Didn't come out as clearly as I'd hoped.
Good choice. He was proably the most effective UN Secretary General. 

Leviathan on March 14, 2009, 03:05:56 pm
Awe, I was rooting for it being Ralph Nader.  King of the Nanny State, Lord Protector of the Welfare System, and overall douchebag extraordinaire.  He'd be fantastic for a kind of doublethink, idealizing the peacenik while committing atrocities.  It's all in the name of having a peaceful world, after all.

Mister Hammerskjold was a simply marvelous leader of the UN.  Just look at all the bureaucrats he hired.  He must've been doing something wonderful with four thousand new officious pricks!  Anyway, looking up the details on him, the only headscratcher would be that he'd be remembered enough to end up on a bill.  Hamilton is incredibly famous among bankers I imagine.  Washington is a household name, complete with mythology built up around him.  Franklin, might've been appalled at the idea of ending up on a bill but was plenty well-known to end up there.  Lincoln was not only the father of the greenback, but also known for the civil war and ending slavery.  Kennedy was mister assasinated.  People somehow believe FDR got us out of the great depression.  Hammerskjold?  He was a petty bureaucrat who died on a diplomatic mission, and I don't think he's much taught in schools that don't bear his name.

Jackson on March 14, 2009, 03:41:08 pm
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Awe, I was rooting for it being Ralph Nader.  King of the Nanny State, Lord Protector of the Welfare System, and overall douchebag extraordinaire.

Something like that. When I think of Nader, I think of him singing the Soviet national anthem. He's liberal enough to be a UN offical, but I doubt the UN would make him Secretary-General. Even they aren't that statist.
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Mister Hammerskjold was a simply marvelous leader of the UN.  Just look at all the bureaucrats he hired. Anyway, looking up the details on him, the only headscratcher would be that he'd be remembered enough to end up on a bill.
Remember, this is a bill issued by the successor to the United Nations. Why would they have a President of the United States on their bills? If the UN's successor is issuing the currency, we can assume they are going to put their own bigwigs on the bill, and the only UN officials anyone can recognize are the Secretary-Generals.
I said Dag Hammerskjold was the most effective UN Secretary-General. Notice how that's setting the bar very low. No Secretary-General of the UN has been particularly effective. Hammerskjold raised a UN army and sent it into battle in the Congo; no Secretary-General before or after him would have the guts to do something like that. He wasn't a great leader, but he is the best the UN has (which says a lot about the UN.)

wdg3rd on March 15, 2009, 08:08:46 am
Mister Hammerskjold was a simply marvelous leader of the UN.  Just look at all the bureaucrats he hired.  He must've been doing something wonderful with four thousand new officious pricks!  Anyway, looking up the details on him, the only headscratcher would be that he'd be remembered enough to end up on a bill.  Hamilton is incredibly famous among bankers I imagine.  Washington is a household name, complete with mythology built up around him.  Franklin, might've been appalled at the idea of ending up on a bill but was plenty well-known to end up there.  Lincoln was not only the father of the greenback, but also known for the civil war and ending slavery.  Kennedy was mister assasinated.  People somehow believe FDR got us out of the great depression.  Hammerskjold?  He was a petty bureaucrat who died on a diplomatic mission, and I don't think he's much taught in schools that don't bear his name.

Thant and Hammerskjold are the only UN heads whose names stand out in my memory, mostly because they were there during most of my youth, and that's the last time I paid attention to the UN.  (I've been living about a dozen miles from Turtle Bay for the last seventeen years, I've never even been by to look at the place).

Their predecessor, Lie, was the first to round up a UN military force (over 80% of which was US troops).  My old man (wdgJr) was one of them, and I'm lucky he went to Korea because he met mom during his second year at Letterman Hospital in the Presidio of San Francisco after that (probably "friendly" fire based on the alloys they dug out of his body) mortar shell took out most of his squad.  (Mom was a WAC nurse's aid, got a BCD due to being pregnant -- unacceptable in a single enlisted woman in the mid 50s, and enlisted women weren't encouraged to be married then -- Dad finally got his medical discharge/retirement, and they married, but Mom always claimed they got "secretly" married before I was conceived, which is a flat-out lie but I've never pushed her on it -- she can think she fooled me, but I could read a calendar and count months at a very early age).  Sorry to mention personal crap, but the Korean War _is_ personal, to me.

The UN has to be abolished, along with every other form of coercive government.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2009, 09:12:19 pm by wdg3rd »
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Rocketman on March 15, 2009, 05:46:35 pm
Considering how it seems that most UN secretary generals seem to be involved with one scandle or another they might have choosen them simply because I don't remember either Mammerskjold or Thant being involved in one.  Or at least not a serious one as time has erased any serious problem.

Scott on March 18, 2009, 12:31:08 pm
I was the one who picked Hammarskjold for the currency, and did it for two reasons:

1) He was  UN bigwig and the UW is the successor to the UN.

2) He was Secretary General at about the time I became old enough to learn about the UN.

So there.

Haven't really discussed this with Sandy but I imagine that UW currency all bears the likenesses of either UN, UW or IMF grand poobahs.

SandySandfort on March 18, 2009, 01:04:28 pm
Haven't really discussed this with Sandy but I imagine that UW currency all bears the likenesses of either UN, UW or IMF grand poobahs.

Sure, why not? In the alternative, the UW might demonstrate its commitment to "multiculturalism" by portraying some national heroes of the past, ChÚ, Marx, Gorbachev, Obama, etc.  ::)

Jackson on March 18, 2009, 06:24:43 pm
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ChÚ, Marx, Gorbachev, Obama

Three hard line communists... and Gorbachev.

KBCraig on March 19, 2009, 03:48:48 am
I was the one who picked Hammarskjold for the currency, and did it for two reasons:

The other cool reason is that it sounds like, but is totally opposite from, Ragnar Danneskj÷ld.  ;D

wdg3rd on March 20, 2009, 06:41:06 pm
I was the one who picked Hammarskjold for the currency, and did it for two reasons:

The other cool reason is that it sounds like, but is totally opposite from, Ragnar Danneskj÷ld.  ;D

Readers sometimes have an advantage over writers that way.  The best example I can recall is a short story by (socialist, but damned fine writer) Asimov who did a little item involving somebody bringing Shakespeare to the 20th century and enrolling him in a college class dissecting his work.  He flunked, of course.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Leviathan on March 21, 2009, 04:52:48 am
Hah, I never read that Asimov.  Though he did one of the best jobs I've ever seen at explaining organic chemistry in a relatively straightforward, reasonably accurate, and engaging enough to keep you reading way that I've ever seen.  Look up his World of Carbon series of educational books.  I first read it when I was I think younger than ten.  And I actually understood most of what I was reading.  I'm smart, but to get even a bright under-ten-year-old to understand how organic chemistry works?  And keep him reading for long enough to absorb it?  You have to be damned good at the explanation.  I think it took at least nine years before my education caught up with the chemistry I learned reading those.

But it's damned hilarious, but probably true, that a lot of authors would have no idea what the hell someone analyzing their work was talking about.

And most of the authors who would go "That's exactly what I was trying to get at!" are just annoying to read.  Because you can't just read them and enjoy their book.  Even Frank Herbert in his Dune series was more readable than many of that type.  And many of his characters in the series had been bred for enhanced sensory perception and cognitive function, and trained to use it to the fullest.  Hell, if I recall Herbert ended up with at least two pages concerning the significance of microscopic variations in how a particular page had been torn off a paper pad, and the microscopic bumps on the bottom of a plant leaf it lead the character to detect and analyze.  One reason Dune has never been put to film in a reasonable manner is the fact that anybody with Bene Gesserit training in the book (even if they're not very talented) would be, by modern standards, a walking crime lab.  Many would be human polygraphs.  And the Mentats could perform feats of logic and calculation that would make any Star Trek Vulcan blush.  And, truth be told, they're also not extremely sympathetic.  They move to Dune because of a silly royalty game with lethal consequences.  Paul ends up fomenting a cult around himself because it's the only way to survive and leave exile.  And even with the actually readable subtexts and symbology in Dune stretching on for page after page, he's more readable than the "artsy fartsy" types who seem to be writing about nothing unless you know how to dissect their bland, uninteresting prose.

By the way?  So far so good on the interesting, engaging prose in the comics  ;D  Yes, I'm the choir when it comes to the subject matter.  But sometimes even that part feels good, knowing that this lonely choirboy has somebody to sing in harmony with.