cyberbard on March 11, 2009, 11:00:34 am
I just wanted to say that today's episode made me grin.  Watching Babbette squirm, and seeing Guy being Mr. Smoothie was great.  It's a nice reversal of how Guy has been dealing with the locals thus far, and I think it shows how he's starting to handle his new situation.

I guess he figures that if he's going to be trapped on Ceres for the rest of his career, he might as well be honest to those around him.  Including himself.

Just my pre-lunch rambling.  :)

deadasdisco on March 11, 2009, 11:43:23 am
Alright, I'm gonna ask the stupid question here, what's with the "Sov." thing the Cereans have?  This may have been addressed in the strip, but Its not coming to mind (and posting is less effort then reading through back eps  ;) )

I'm pretty sure its a gender neutral "Mr." or "Ms.", and I'm guessing is short for "Sovereign", as in independent and self-ruling.  Am I right?

BTW, I'm enjoying this strip more then I expected for something that has an ideology.  Generally, I try to steer clear of things that dabble in 'shoulds'.

SandySandfort on March 11, 2009, 01:02:42 pm
I guess he figures that if he's going to be trapped on Ceres for the rest of his career...

I think Guy and everyone else knew it was a one-way trip and that his old career was over (and thank chaos for that).

Just my pre-lunch rambling.  :)

No prob. Postprandial ramblings are usually dull.

SandySandfort on March 11, 2009, 01:21:03 pm
Alright, I'm gonna ask the stupid question here, what's with the "Sov." thing the Cereans have?  This may have been addressed in the strip, but Its not coming to mind (and posting is less effort then reading through back eps  ;) )

Apparently, it did...

I'm pretty sure its a gender neutral "Mr." or "Ms.", and I'm guessing is short for "Sovereign", as in independent and self-ruling.  Am I right?

Right as rain, Boy Wonder.  ;)

BTW, I'm enjoying this strip more then I expected for something that has an ideology.  Generally, I try to steer clear of things that dabble in 'shoulds'.

I don't care for, and I don't write, "message" stories. Of course, there is ideology; that's the way we are built, but I won't force it on my characters. They write their own stories. In later arcs you will see that much of the solar system is highly individualistic. (How could pioneers escaping from Terra be otherwise?) However, as Heinlein said (and this is from memory), "No, not all cats are black at midnight. They are many shades of gray." So Mars has something like a minarchist infrastructure, with almost complete tolerance for the internal affairs of enclaves. Lunar communities are similarly self-governing, but largely due to the UW's limited ability to force its will on them. The Belt and beyond is pretty much totally anarchistic, Mercury is a mostly gated communities, etc. Lots of nuances. Hey, one Martian enclave is called "Lenin's Hammer." Care to guess their political bent?

deadasdisco on March 11, 2009, 02:03:07 pm
Red Planet Reds!  Ha! 

deadasdisco on March 11, 2009, 02:32:52 pm
Actually, your reply brings up a question I'd had about the series.  At the beginning, there's this sense that there's just Earth and Ceres settled.  But how far out does humanity reach in the days of "Escape from Terra"? You've already mentioned Mercury, Mars, the Moon and (my personal fav) "the Belt and beyond".  Now there's a very strong implication that the vast, VAST majority of humans still live on the old Homeworld, but how far out do the first wave reach?  Or is that a surprise?

SandySandfort on March 11, 2009, 02:37:27 pm
Red Planet Reds!  Ha! 

Okay, I laughed out loud (because I didn't thing of it). Good one.

SandySandfort on March 11, 2009, 02:47:52 pm
Actually, your reply brings up a question I'd had about the series.  At the beginning, there's this sense that there's just Earth and Ceres settled.  But how far out does humanity reach in the days of "Escape from Terra"? You've already mentioned Mercury, Mars, the Moon and (my personal fav) "the Belt and beyond".  Now there's a very strong implication that the vast, VAST majority of humans still live on the old Homeworld...

Yup. Most. Less than 1/100 of 1% live off world.

.., but how far out do the first wave reach?  Or is that a surprise?

;D

cyberbard on March 11, 2009, 03:12:54 pm
Yup. Most. Less than 1/100 of 1% live off world.

That's very different from my own sci-fi setting.  In my milieu, almost 70% live away from Terra.  Terra is still the single largest concentration of humans on one particular body, but it's no longer the majority.  Mind you, much of this off-world migration was the result of forced relocation by several of the terrestrial power blocks, as a collective response to a laundry list of social, economic, political and environmental pressures.  It did solve the environmental problems, but the jury is still out on the other three categories.

My stories take place several decades after this practice was stopped.  By then humans were well established elsewhere in the Sol system.  Was the forced migration the right thing to do?  The debate is expected to last for some years to come.

SandySandfort on March 11, 2009, 06:26:58 pm
That's very different from my own sci-fi setting.  In my milieu, almost 70% live away from Terra.  Terra is still the single largest concentration of humans on one particular body, but it's no longer the majority.  Mind you, much of this off-world migration was the result of forced relocation by several of the terrestrial power blocks, as a collective response to a laundry list of social, economic, political and environmental pressures.  It did solve the environmental problems, but the jury is still out on the other three categories.

My stories take place several decades after this practice was stopped.  By then humans were well established elsewhere in the Sol system.  Was the forced migration the right thing to do?  The debate is expected to last for some years to come.

Any plans to publish your work?

Sean Roach on March 11, 2009, 07:50:42 pm
Sounds like something I read by Jerry Pournelle.  Although, in it the forced emigrations are ongoing right up to the end.

It was collected into an omnibus titled "The Prince".

Basically, minarchist, with a civil war thrown in.

Rocketman on March 11, 2009, 09:22:32 pm
In other words it's kind of like what California is now, high crime rate, far too many petty bureaucrats, (but then I repeat myself) crippling taxes and regulations.  Productive people are leaving California in droves.  By the way do you know how California is like grape nut cereal?  Take away the fruits, flakes and nuts and there's nothing left.  ;D

Jackson on March 12, 2009, 02:40:04 am
Quote
Yup. Most. Less than 1/100 of 1% live off world.
Well, this makes Reginald's threat to Guy on page 98 a threat to kill 99.99% of the human race. Would Reginald actually carry out such a threat?
You would think that would really alarm the UW. After all, a person whom they believe to be an absolute monarch threatened to render the human race nearly extinct, and he has the capability to carry out his threat (although, I don't see why the UW couldn't deflect incoming asteroids from Ceres, or shoot them down with nukes.) You would think this would make Reginald the United World's Public Enemy #1.

Also, on page 109, Guy describes Secretary General Tanduk Timah as "tin horn", but if Secretary General Timah rules over more than 99.99% of the human race, he is hardly a tin horn ruler.

Scott on March 12, 2009, 11:19:36 am
Quote
Would Reginald actually carry out such a threat?

No, it was a bluff. In the original prose story version, the narration points out that even in the unlikely event that Reggie or any other Belter would try such a stunt, the others would never tolerate such a thing and would both take steps to stop it and deal very harshly with the perpetrator.

When translating the prose story to comic strip, I couldn't find a way to make this point in any way that didn't seem really clunky, and fit the daily-strip format's pacing. All I could do was have Bert give Reggie a dirty look when Reggie made the threat to Guy during the negotiations.

Perhaps I can find a way to bring this up in a future strip.

SandySandfort on March 12, 2009, 01:42:34 pm
Well, this makes Reginald's threat to Guy on page 98 a threat to kill 99.99% of the human race. Would Reginald actually carry out such a threat?

Like Scott said. The actual threat will come up in a future arc.

... although, I don't see why the UW couldn't deflect incoming asteroids from Ceres, or shoot them down with nukes.

Well, nukes cannot shoot down asteroids. They can break them up and makes things much worse. Also, asteroids wouldn't be coming from Ceres (as there are none there), but from a thousand different parts of the Belt. Deflect one? Sure, pretty easy. Deflect 10,000...?

Also, on page 109, Guy describes Secretary General Tanduk Timah as "tin horn", but if Secretary General Timah rules over more than 99.99% of the human race, he is hardly a tin horn ruler.

"Tinhorn" references the man and not the office. In addition, the Secretary General is a hack, a functionary. He's just the front man for the Powers that Be. In any case, government is the great lie that anyone rule over everyone. Governments can only do so with the consent of the victim, the policeman within. (How about THAT for some ideology!)   ;)