NotDebonair on January 15, 2009, 07:35:27 am
Quote
"To all the Callahan's Places there ever were or ever will be, whatever they may be called ant to all the merry maniacs and happy fools who are fortunate enough to stumble into one: may none of them arrive too late!"

Toast in The Callahan Chronicals, Spider Robinson (1996)

Guy still hasn't caught on to the fact that the laws and mores here are different from home.  Or, as another favorite of mine remarked with regard to the proper time to ingest mood-altering substances, "It's five o'clock somewhere."

John DeWitt on January 15, 2009, 09:03:33 am
OT, but in an environment with a very small fraction of earth-normal gravity, would people really be drinking hot coffee from open mugs?  Sounds dangerous.

SandySandfort on January 15, 2009, 11:46:06 am
OT, but in an environment with a very small fraction of earth-normal gravity, would people really be drinking hot coffee from open mugs?  Sounds dangerous.
Actually, yes they would. Check this out: http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Forum30/HTML/000746-2.html#coffee

Corydon on January 15, 2009, 08:02:38 pm
OT, but in an environment with a very small fraction of earth-normal gravity, would people really be drinking hot coffee from open mugs?  Sounds dangerous.
Actually, yes they would. Check this out: http://www.collectspace.com/ubb/Forum30/HTML/000746-2.html#coffee

Thing is, the astronaut in the video explains that it's the teardrop shape of the cup that lets him use it for coffee.  The cups in the strip appear to be normally-shaped cylinders.  So unless it's a magic nanotech cup, I don't see how it would work.  And even if the angle is wrong, and the cup is that teardrop shape, would the waitress would be able to just pour the coffee from a regular pot, as she does in the panel from a couple of days back?

Sean Roach on January 15, 2009, 09:35:28 pm
She'd probably need to pour down a stirring rod.

SandySandfort on January 15, 2009, 09:59:12 pm
Thing is, the astronaut in the video explains that it's the teardrop shape of the cup that lets him use it for coffee.  The cups in the strip appear to be normally-shaped cylinders. 
Sure, from the outside...
And even if the angle is wrong, and the cup is that teardrop shape, would the waitress would be able to just pour the coffee from a regular pot, as she does in the panel from a couple of days back?
Remember, there is some gravity on Ceres (.028G). Down is down.

Leviathan on January 19, 2009, 01:30:52 pm
It'd take a little while, and to us high-grav types it'd seem intolerably difficult to manage the behavior of the liquids.  Inertia combined with fluid and low gravity makes for a lot of interesting sloshes, heh.  But it'd be doable with some practice, and many cerereans have been practicing those little things their whole lives.  Immigrants probably for years on average.

SandySandfort on March 04, 2009, 09:38:13 am
...The cups in the strip appear to be normally-shaped cylinders.  So unless it's a magic nanotech cup, I don't see how it would work.  And even if the angle is wrong, and the cup is that teardrop shape, would the waitress would be able to just pour the coffee from a regular pot, as she does in the panel from a couple of days back?

Check this out:

http://www.gizmag.com/zero-g-coffee-cup-11146/11146/

Sean Roach on March 04, 2009, 10:12:20 am
You could put a coarse mesh across the mouth of the cut about half an inch down.  The mesh would provide something for surface tension to cling to, while still letting liquid in an out.  Think of the drips that hang in a windowscreen after you hit a window with a garden hose, or the fact that puptents don't leak until you touch them.

I still say a glass rod would be needed to fill the things reliably.  Whether or not it was attached to the pitcher or put in the cup like a straw first is irrelevant.

 

anything