Rocketman on May 27, 2010, 09:46:26 am
Not FDR nor Eisenhower, although those are both good guesses.  No, the person was Senator John F. Kennedy.  Interesting how JFK who was considered to be pro-gun by the standards back then was also intelligent enough to know that as marginal tax rates are LOWERED it stimulates the economy and provides for more jobs and more tax renevue for the government.  In today's climate I guess that would make him a republican. (this is where howls of anguish can be heard from the liberal democract base that has deified him.)
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 09:48:15 am by Rocketman »

John DeWitt on June 10, 2010, 07:44:13 am
Very late coming back to this discussion, but as an intro to Heinlein I'd suggest Door Into Summer.  Hardly political at all, which is fairly unusual for a Heinlein, a cracking good plot in a light, easy read.  Plus we learn that Heinlein independently invented CAD/CAM, non-humanoid utility robots that don't have personalities and/or try to take over the world, (Okay, they might have appeared in earlier fiction) and a few other things I don't remember before my coffee.

paulr on June 10, 2010, 05:02:35 pm
I am of the understanding that Tom Hanks owned or still owns the movie rights to STRANGER. In his younger years, I think he would have been great in the role as Smith. I think Tom gets it and would make a reasonably good movie, if he chose to do so. I have no idea whom he should cast as Smith, though, if he ever makes it. Whom would you cast in that role?

How about going a little older and using Robert Downey Jr. or Tim Roth?

terry_freeman on June 11, 2010, 11:11:50 am
Valentine Michael Smith was in his early 20s. Who wants to see Robert Downey Jr as a 40-year old virgin?

koanhead on June 11, 2010, 04:42:26 pm
Quote


I am of the understanding that Tom Hanks owned or still owns the movie rights to STRANGER. In his younger years, I think he would have been great in the role as Smith. I think Tom gets it and would make a reasonably good movie, if he chose to do so. I have no idea whom he should cast as Smith, though, if he ever makes it. Whom would you cast in that role?

It would have to be someone young, and with the dedication, stamina and willingness to change his body of a De Niro (possibly not the best example, but the best I can think of off the top of my head).
I think Hanks would still make an excellent Ben Caxton, especially at his age. Ben's age is never explicitly stated IIRC, though some of his more impulsive actions might suggest a younger man than Mr. Hanks is today. However, as my Gram used to say, "You're never too old to be foolish."
That of course raises the question of who might portray Gillian Boardman. I would suggest Gillian Anderson, as she is still attractive at her age (similar to that of Mr. Hanks) and old enough to believably play a senior nurse. Also I enjoy the name synchronicity.
Who should play Jubal Harshaw? I have a few suggestions. Ben Kingsley comes to mind, as does Wilfred Brimley. I don't think Mr. Brimley is available any more... but no! According to Wikipedia, I am incorrect.
Unfortunately, the incorrect objection I held for Mr. Brimley applies to my first choice, Louis Mackey, a true philosopher, sometime actor, and inspirational figure:

 http://www.utexas.edu/faculty/council/2004-2005/memorials/mackey/mackey.html

I'm sorry if that's not clickable. I hate BBCode and refuse to spend time learning it, as I have wasted too much of my life learning stupid dead-end languages as it is.

Aaanyway... who else can we cast for "Stranger"? How about:

Anne: Madonna
Miriam: Scarlett Johannsen
Dorcas: Demi Moore
Duke: Sam Elliott
Cpt. Van Tromp: Sig Hansen
Dr. Mahmoud: Fritjof Capra
Dr. Sven Nelson: Hugh Laurie
Joe Douglas: Aaron Eckhart
Madame Vesant: Helen Thomas
Tom Boone: Brian Blessed
Alice Douglas: Jane Kaczmarek
Larry: Steve Buscemi
Patty Paiwonski: Patricia Arquette
James Cavendish: Patrick Leahy
Gil Berquist: Phil Proctor
Archangel Foster: Ian McKellen
Archangel Digby: Howard Ramis

Please understand that the list is mostly jokes. I think a good director could make a movie like this work with that cast, but then Tarantino managed to get a worthwhile performance out of Travolta. Who knew?

It's just too bad that Mrs. Heinlein is gone- among other things, she could probably cast a movie of that book even more deftly than her husband would have done.

Maybe we could ask Spider?


dough560 on June 12, 2010, 01:24:46 am
I've said it before in another post:  Some "Names" may help, but central characters should be unknowns.  Established actors have "baggage".

wdg3rd on June 12, 2010, 02:46:57 am
I've said it before in another post:  Some "Names" may help, but central characters should be unknowns.  Established actors have "baggage".

Totally there with you.  Mike and the other young characters (Mike, Jubal's secretaries, Jill) have to be unknowns of proper age.  Anybody from Ben and Duke up in years, established actors could be used (yeah, for Jubal I'd go with Kingsley over Brimley, but either could do it [I'd have preferred George Burns if he was still around]).  Definitely Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry [and Rowan Atkinson and Tony Robinson] could be fit into various roles.  As well any of the folks on "Red Dwarf".  Yeah, if I'm showing a liking for a small subset of British actors, most of them can do fine American accents and "Red Dwarf" was the best SF series ever broadcast prior to "Firefly", IMNSHO -- edges out "Babylon 5" in my "watch it again" scale (and I've got all episodes of both series [and "Firefly"] handy for the odd weekend when I'm home and La Esposa is off to a Media SF convention).

If a SiaSL (or TMiaHM) movie happens, I'll probably hate it as much as every previous work on film attributed to Heinlein (aside from "Destination Moon", but he was actually involved in that one).  Because it will be f u c k e d up by the Powers in Hollywood and New York as much as ever.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Rocketman on June 12, 2010, 04:15:59 am
I've said it before in another post:  Some "Names" may help, but central characters should be unknowns.  Established actors have "baggage".
Quite right Dough.  I can think of a number of actors both male and female that while they do a fine job of acting while their heads are clear and they're concentrating on their jobs, can't seem to keep themselves out of the "nose candy" or start throwing themselves a hissy fit and storm off the set for one stupid reason or another.  Needless to say many directors don't even want to bother with them.  Why should they when there is a oversupply of actors that won't cause a scene or try to impress their views of how a movie should be run.  Most stars who stay around know that their image to the world is the reason that they have a job in acting in the first place and won't mess it up.

SandySandfort on June 12, 2010, 10:03:23 am
If a SiaSL (or TMiaHM) movie happens, I'll probably hate it as much as every previous work on film attributed to Heinlein (aside from "Destination Moon", but he was actually involved in that one).  Because it will be f u c k e d up by the Powers in Hollywood and New York as much as ever.

There are a couple of possible saving graces. There are indie and non-mainstream film makers who are libertarians. I know of at least three who are libertarian or fellow travelers. We might see one of them bring these two properties to life.

 Also, CGI and motion capture technologies are getting cheap enough for small film companies to buy or rent. Really good CGI is the future. Soon, almost anyone with any talent at all will be able to produce professional quality, feature-length movies. Bab5 used a cheap Video Toaster to achieve essentially all of its F/X and it was great.* We are way past that now. The latest technology was showcased in Avatar. As simple-minded as the plot was, the visuals were undeniably stunning.

* I wrote "The Spirit of the Brush," for Wired. It was an eye-candy piece about Ron Thornton, the guy who created all of those lovely space ships and Bab5, itself.

wdg3rd on June 12, 2010, 09:08:23 pm

 Also, CGI and motion capture technologies are getting cheap enough for small film companies to buy or rent. Really good CGI is the future. Soon, almost anyone with any talent at all will be able to produce professional quality, feature-length movies. Bab5 used a cheap Video Toaster to achieve essentially all of its F/X and it was great.* We are way past that now. The latest technology was showcased in Avatar. As simple-minded as the plot was, the visuals were undeniably stunning.

* I wrote "The Spirit of the Brush," for Wired. It was an eye-candy piece about Ron Thornton, the guy who created all of those lovely space ships and Bab5, itself.

I did tech support for the store in Sherman Oaks that sold those Amiga 2000s that were used for the B5 pilot.  We didn't sell low-end Amigas.  The typical Amiga 2000 system we sold was practically rebuilt from the ground up, like a "stock" NASCAR racing machine.  What with the improved components and add-ons and peripherals, a typical package we sold was upwards of $20k in 1989.  Not counting software.  Not a game system, though Arkanoid went out with each and every one.

While I did some of the hardware work, my main job was supporting our sales of Unix systems (both Santa Cruz Operation [when they were still producing product instead of lawsuits] and AT&T) on AT&T and NCR hardware.  (AT&T was more expandable, NCR was more reliable).
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Scott on June 14, 2010, 10:08:49 pm
I could be wrong, but I'd thought that the Bab5 producers switched to Lightwave, running on Wintel boxes, for the main series production.  Amiga/Video Toaster could do amazing things, but one of the most amazing things it did was corrupt an entire hard disk full of files when it crashed. Todd Rundgren has a fairly famous rant about his experiences with that set-up.

SandySandfort on June 15, 2010, 12:20:31 am
I could be wrong, but I'd thought that the Bab5 producers switched to Lightwave, running on Wintel boxes, for the main series production.  Amiga/Video Toaster could do amazing things, but one of the most amazing things it did was corrupt an entire hard disk full of files when it crashed. Todd Rundgren has a fairly famous rant about his experiences with that set-up.

When I interviewed Thornton, he was using the Video Toaster. After that, I cannot say.

wdg3rd on June 15, 2010, 09:32:00 am
I could be wrong, but I'd thought that the Bab5 producers switched to Lightwave, running on Wintel boxes, for the main series production.  Amiga/Video Toaster could do amazing things, but one of the most amazing things it did was corrupt an entire hard disk full of files when it crashed. Todd Rundgren has a fairly famous rant about his experiences with that set-up.

I did specifically mention the B5 pilot.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

deliberatus on July 28, 2010, 03:56:51 pm
Um, 'Farmer In the Sky' has our hero sit down on the job, to plug a meteoric hole in the hull of the ship he is in. Got to keep the meteorite as a pocket piece as a memento of his bruising encounter with astrophysics.
 :-[

wdg3rd on July 28, 2010, 10:45:37 pm
Um, 'Farmer In the Sky' has our hero sit down on the job, to plug a meteoric hole in the hull of the ship he is in. Got to keep the meteorite as a pocket piece as a memento of his bruising encounter with astrophysics.
 :-[

In Farmer in the Sky, Bill Lermer plugs the leak with his Boy Scout uniform, not his skin.  Air is still being lost, just not near as quickly, so the crew can evacuate the kids in the room and properly plug the hole.

Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot