DrakBibliophile on December 30, 2019, 01:37:04 pm
https://www.quantumvibe.com/strip?page=2038

It should be easy for him to show that he wasn't working on the warning sat when his security codes were used but questions about who got his security codes very likely will cause him trouble.  :(
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Drak Bibliophile (The Book Loving Dragon)
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Sometimes the Dragon Wins!!
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customdesigned on January 01, 2020, 09:44:36 am
He should be in *very* big trouble.  Even though he wasn't an intentional traitor, it was his responsibility, and I got the impression that "visitors" were not officially allowed.

DrakBibliophile on January 01, 2020, 11:40:24 am
I got the impression that the thief got the codes in his home.

So the error might be "taking the codes" home.

IE She didn't get the codes from his "work-place".

But yes, he's going to be in trouble for not "safe guarding" those codes.


He should be in *very* big trouble.  Even though he wasn't an intentional traitor, it was his responsibility, and I got the impression that "visitors" were not officially allowed.
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Drak Bibliophile (The Book Loving Dragon)
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Sometimes the Dragon Wins!!
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lurkergao on January 02, 2020, 03:37:50 pm
If court rooms were legal equations he would be fine. He had no knowledge his ex was a foreign asset. He was robbed. He didnt know his codes had been pilfered and provided her no assistance knowingly. I'm assuming he followed mandated security protocols. Thing is those security protocols were designed badly, otherwise this wouldnt have happened. If your entire defense network can be compromised by one engineer having a sleep over you have a badly designed defense strategy. Realistically though Stern is fucked. Court rooms arent math equations they are decided by people and the people need a scapegoat. They could go after the management that approved this system. But in any organization i've ever worked in they go after the engi that was most adjacent to ground zero. I do find it interesting that the general has been able to piece this together so quickly given what they are dealing with. Hint hint maybe the general had prior knowledge.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 03:45:52 pm by lurkergao »

DrakBibliophile on January 02, 2020, 05:26:24 pm
Minor nit, Alex Stern is being "chewed out" by a Coronel Glass (Colonel Glass) not by a General.  ;)

If court rooms were legal equations he would be fine. He had no knowledge his ex was a foreign asset. He was robbed. He didnt know his codes had been pilfered and provided her no assistance knowingly. I'm assuming he followed mandated security protocols. Thing is those security protocols were designed badly, otherwise this wouldnt have happened. If your entire defense network can be compromised by one engineer having a sleep over you have a badly designed defense strategy. Realistically though Stern is fucked. Court rooms arent math equations they are decided by people and the people need a scapegoat. They could go after the management that approved this system. But in any organization i've ever worked in they go after the engi that was most adjacent to ground zero. I do find it interesting that the general has been able to piece this together so quickly given what they are dealing with. Hint hint maybe the general had prior knowledge.
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Drak Bibliophile (The Book Loving Dragon)
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Sometimes the Dragon Wins!!
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DrakBibliophile on January 02, 2020, 05:42:35 pm
Follow up.

I don't see the problem concerning "how fast" Alex Stern is getting on the Hot Seat.

It's going to be obvious what direction the impactor had to follow and computer "records" are likely going to show which Sat should have detected it.

We're talking about a High Tech society where computers (including AIs) are advanced enough to spot things like this fairly quickly.

And with a disaster of this size, the Powers That Be will want answers fast and this organization will be put on the spot very quickly.

And yes, the organization will want answers and might want to use poor Alex as a scapegoat.

Of course, the Colonel was likely told to "find answers Yesterday".  :)

If court rooms were legal equations he would be fine. He had no knowledge his ex was a foreign asset. He was robbed. He didnt know his codes had been pilfered and provided her no assistance knowingly. I'm assuming he followed mandated security protocols. Thing is those security protocols were designed badly, otherwise this wouldnt have happened. If your entire defense network can be compromised by one engineer having a sleep over you have a badly designed defense strategy. Realistically though Stern is fucked. Court rooms arent math equations they are decided by people and the people need a scapegoat. They could go after the management that approved this system. But in any organization i've ever worked in they go after the engi that was most adjacent to ground zero. I do find it interesting that the general has been able to piece this together so quickly given what they are dealing with. Hint hint maybe the general had prior knowledge.
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Drak Bibliophile (The Book Loving Dragon)
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Sometimes the Dragon Wins!!
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UncleRice on January 03, 2020, 09:21:37 am
Alex should probably get a little liability here, but he should not be blamed for the terrible security involved. Here is what I saw:

1: All regular maintenance should be scheduled, so that if anyone, authorized or not, approaches the beacon outside of the scheduled maintenance, security should be alerted and they need to be looking through some cameras.

2: Using current year technology, facial recognition cameras operating in the visible light range, the terahertz range, and about 800 megahertz, could be staring at anyone approaching at any time and alert security if the system doesn't recognize who is approaching. Convert this to QV tech, and it works even better.

3: Multiple RFID chips could be embedded in his work uniform for further identification.

4: When the person finally puts in the codes, whether they are the right ones or not, they should need to talk to and get approval from 3 security people if the visit is outside regular scheduled maintenance.

5: The
Stupid criminals put on a mask and rob people with a gun.
Smart criminals put on a suit, call themselves politicians, and rob people with writ of law.

lurkergao on January 03, 2020, 03:06:25 pm
I work in IT as a system analyst. Any person in charge is generally not technically oriented enough to find the point of failure in a huge complex system like this one. Thats why they hire the techs. Even an exceptionally clever person like Alyss is going to have a hard time noticing a hardware hack to a system she doesnt regularly work on, at least within a 24 hour timespan. The colonel may have previously been a tech that worked on the system. Thats great i used to work on ms4. I cant remember much about ms4 now that i dont use it even though it still exists in my org. He apparently went there personally and either was present for the diagnosis or did it himself which makes him sound awesome but also allows him to mess with chain of custody of evidence. Also the spy switched inputs to blind the sensor which sounds like she modified or replaced the circuit board on the sensor. The colonel may be a tech himself but unless he invented the device personally he would probably need to contact the manufacturer to pinpoint the cause so exactly. The first conclusion i would have is the board was defective and the problem either didnt show up in testing or the tech got lazy and cut corners on the test. Knowing exactly what spy lady did to the inputs, That sounds like a massive pain to find out without prior knowledge.  Wouldnt be weird at all if this conversation was happening a week afterward or after 3 days of nobody sleeping. Seems real weird when the colonel is able give his bosses exactly what happened and arrest the culprit on charges of sabotage within 24 hours. Also consider this: somebody setup that system so only 1 sensor needed to be sabotaged to compromise the system. And that one vulnerable sensor would be really hard to spot without inside knowledge. So yeah i think colonel glass is a bit suspicious.