MirrorField on August 19, 2019, 08:03:32 am
If ISO standard second is still the same, the unix epoch is still the same. And there is no need for "standard calendar".

Local "calendar frippery" easily converts to unix epoch, which is simply a counter counting seconds from midnight 1.1.1970. One sees no reason why this would change without colossal disaster on the scale of "we need to reinvent transistor and computers". Most likely the ancient computers of Zytemonde were running this same system behind "local" calendar and clock, which were adapted to local planetary cycles.

Spacers with no need to deal with local day/night/year cycles can easily use simple SI multiples of second: Kilosecond (about 16.6 minutes), Megasecond (about 11.6 days) and so on. A 64-bit integer as a standard timestamp is very easy for computers to handle and to convert into local format, whatever they may be.

See: here, here and here

0z79 on August 24, 2019, 03:10:58 am
I was about to wonder aloud how many five-days the author meant; whether he meant 2, 4, 8 or 40..

But then I remembered Dave Kellett, and how he permanently banned me from his discussion board... He said he'd update at least once a month. Then he waited five months; I commented on his tardiness and got smacked with the ban-hammer. I can NEVER, EVER comment on Drive Webcomic, or Sheldon Webcomic.

I'll err on the side of caution, and assume that Scott's just as sensitive.

DON'T MEGABAN ME FOR WONDERING, GOOD SIR!!

DrakBibliophile on August 24, 2019, 11:24:17 am
I don't know.

It seems logical but meat-body humans aren't always logical/reasonable.

IMO it is very possible that even "spacers" would be more confortable talking in terms of "tomorrow", "next five-days", "next cycle", etc than talking about events "multiplies of seconds" in the future.

I suspect that if anybody in the Real World wanted everybody to use your method, there would be massive resistance including "you and what army type of resistance". ;)

If ISO standard second is still the same, the unix epoch is still the same. And there is no need for "standard calendar".

Local "calendar frippery" easily converts to unix epoch, which is simply a counter counting seconds from midnight 1.1.1970. One sees no reason why this would change without colossal disaster on the scale of "we need to reinvent transistor and computers". Most likely the ancient computers of Zytemonde were running this same system behind "local" calendar and clock, which were adapted to local planetary cycles.

Spacers with no need to deal with local day/night/year cycles can easily use simple SI multiples of second: Kilosecond (about 16.6 minutes), Megasecond (about 11.6 days) and so on. A 64-bit integer as a standard timestamp is very easy for computers to handle and to convert into local format, whatever they may be.

See: here, here and here
*
Drak Bibliophile (The Book Loving Dragon)
*
Sometimes the Dragon Wins!!
*

Apollo-Soyuz on August 26, 2019, 11:32:08 pm
Seems sorta funny that aggregator software  (a/k/a "aggravator" for the way it helped facilitate blog arguments) fell out of style so quickly.

This may come as news to Scott even, but there is an RSS feed for QV: view-source:https://www.bigheadpress.com/rssupdates

I wonder if anyone makes one that takes json? RSS and atom feel like bloat.

(Yea, I upgraded my PC. spun a whole new distro, and never bothered to move my feeds over. That was at least 2 PCs ago.)

Scott on August 28, 2019, 08:48:21 am
I was about to wonder aloud how many five-days the author meant; whether he meant 2, 4, 8 or 40..

But then I remembered Dave Kellett, and how he permanently banned me from his discussion board... He said he'd update at least once a month. Then he waited five months; I commented on his tardiness and got smacked with the ban-hammer. I can NEVER, EVER comment on Drive Webcomic, or Sheldon Webcomic.

I'll err on the side of caution, and assume that Scott's just as sensitive.

DON'T MEGABAN ME FOR WONDERING, GOOD SIR!!

I'm surprised to hear that about Kellett. I thought he was more laid-back.

No, I'm not going to ban people for questioning my story, my update schedule, or whatever. I only ban people for being out-right abusive. We're cool.

Scott on August 28, 2019, 08:58:23 am
If ISO standard second is still the same, the unix epoch is still the same. And there is no need for "standard calendar".

Local "calendar frippery" easily converts to unix epoch, which is simply a counter counting seconds from midnight 1.1.1970. One sees no reason why this would change without colossal disaster on the scale of "we need to reinvent transistor and computers". Most likely the ancient computers of Zytemonde were running this same system behind "local" calendar and clock, which were adapted to local planetary cycles.

Spacers with no need to deal with local day/night/year cycles can easily use simple SI multiples of second: Kilosecond (about 16.6 minutes), Megasecond (about 11.6 days) and so on. A 64-bit integer as a standard timestamp is very easy for computers to handle and to convert into local format, whatever they may be.

See: here, here and here

Among themselves, AIs do tend to use the system you describe, except they count from 4 October 1957 CE, when Sputnik went up. This helps align the AI system with the meat-brain "Space Age" system.  In fact, I used it in the "Assimilation" arc. But as Drak points out, humans are more comfortable with intervals that more or less line up with the cycles of the place they evolved in. (Tin Men convert back and forth.) Unix is considered a quaint artifact of a by-gone era.

Skull the Troll on September 03, 2019, 03:06:51 pm
Humm, theres a story there, I think.  If I'd been forced to guess ahead of learning this I would have thought they would measure from the time the first artificial brain passed a turning test, or some such. But, now that I think about it, the Turing Test feels off. "The human tells me I'm human like? How nice. I feel validated." Maybe they would measure from the first time a computer was irritated by a human. :)
« Last Edit: September 03, 2019, 03:09:19 pm by Skull the Troll »

 

anything