Rocketman on June 15, 2007, 08:43:05 am
I noticed that the coeds costumes were a tip of the hat to the old Edgar Rice Burroughs, John Carter series comics that I used to read and enjoy as a child.  Nice touch.   ;D

wdg3rd on June 15, 2007, 02:34:05 pm
Yeah, they always overdress the women in the comics.  In the novels the women wear considerably less.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Zen Redneck on June 15, 2007, 03:56:20 pm
Yeah, they always overdress the women in the comics.  In the novels the women wear considerably less.


Yep.  Definitely a wuss-out:)

Rocketman on June 15, 2007, 05:17:49 pm
Should be interesting when the rangers get a load of the "aliens" that they're supposed to protect.   :o

jrl on June 17, 2007, 06:25:14 pm
It seems that in Neil's probability universe, one of the constants (in free countries) is that people are universally and openly armed.

Now, Gokk is carrying conventional firearms, but the lovely young Martians' costumes don't have enough coverage to hide a better-than-nothing Baby Browning, much less the serious iron most of Neil's characters prefer.

Is Gokk, affecting historical arms so people will understand the threat, while the young ladies are armed according to the fashion of their time and place, perhaps with energy weapons integrated into their jewelry?

Zen Redneck on June 18, 2007, 11:15:34 pm
Not bad, jrl, not bad at all.

Rocketman on June 18, 2007, 11:32:59 pm
JRL:
     One things for sure, they're not packing Desert Eagles.  At over 250 pounds and in winter clothing even I can't do it.

Frank B. on June 19, 2007, 03:56:47 pm
JRL:
     One things for sure, they're not packing Desert Eagles.  At over 250 pounds and in winter clothing even I can't do it.

Seen Pirates III yet?  I was rather impressed by the rather large gun Elizabeth pulled out from under her very short skirt.   :o


Rocketman on June 19, 2007, 07:19:55 pm
Haven't seen Pirates 3 yet.  Or one or two for that matter.  You did jog a memory cell though.  One of my favorite lines come from the movie "Armed and Dangerous" with the late John Candy.  He had near the end of
the movie an enormous revolver which if I remember correctly was a Freedom Arms .454 and was taking to his partner.  The line was "Yep, this gun is only legal in two states, and this isn't one of them."

wdg3rd on June 19, 2007, 07:34:44 pm
And don't forget the "pistol" that Jack Nicholson as the Joker pulled out of his pants after Batman took his balloons away.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Sphynx on June 22, 2007, 07:38:50 pm
It seems that in Neil's probability universe, one of the constants (in free countries) is that people are universally and openly armed.

Now, Gokk is carrying conventional firearms, but the lovely young Martians' costumes don't have enough coverage to hide a better-than-nothing Baby Browning, much less the serious iron most of Neil's characters prefer.

Is Gokk, affecting historical arms so people will understand the threat, while the young ladies are armed according to the fashion of their time and place, perhaps with energy weapons integrated into their jewelry?

JRL: Notice in this week's release that Bettie reminds Gokk that he still has the guns she loaned him, also I seem to remeber a similar comment earlier in their conversation with Mr. Bear.  As to the "Red Martian" ladies arms, that was Bettie's question in the last panel today.

TO: L. Neil, Rex, Scott, & Frank - Add my "Way to Go!" to the list for the Edgar Rice Burrows omage.  It reminds me that there is a great deal of proto-anarchism (granting that there is also a mix of authoritarianism, of one governing shade or another) in the Captain John Carter series.

NICELY DONE  ;D

FYI: for fans of E.R.B.'s Mars series, the Science Fiction Book Club has just released the fourth and last volume (Hardback) of their re-publication of these 12 books.

Scott on June 30, 2007, 11:11:45 am
According to the script, the girls are supposed to be "naked, except for the jewelry they wear in odd places."  Not wanting this to be an NC-17 comic, I decided to expand on that "jewelry" notion a bit and yes, I was inspired by Frank Frazetta's illustrations of ERB's Barsoomian women.

Neil calls the results "interplanetary pasties."

What I find most interesting is that I'd imagined the girls' armor to be various shades of gold or silver, but Jen colored them more exotically. And as it turns out, this works very well.

I've managed to rationalize the girl's lack of clothing in my own mind, a bit, by noting that in this 300-year future humans and lamviin are interacting in a common environment -- something halfway between what we'd regard as comfortable (75 deg.F, 30-50 pct humidity) and what a lamviin regards as comfortable (135 deg.F, 2 pct humidity. So the girls are dressed for 100-105 degrees, and very dry. They've had to get used to it a bit, just as Gokk has had to get used to temps 30 degrees below his natural comfort zone.


wdg3rd on July 01, 2007, 12:09:04 pm
I was sort of assuming they were wearing smartsuits set to mostly transparent.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Rocketman on July 01, 2007, 06:25:25 pm
I supposed it's possible that the coed's "clothing" contains energy absorbing material since the primary threat to them in the future would logically also have energy weapons.  The problem is that old fashioned kenetic slug throwers would still work.  Of course if your a Gurka or a Nazi and a beautiful almost naked woman suddenly shows up in front of you and seems to not carrying any weapons on her then she's got a second or two to make you regret your hesitation.   ;D

Sphynx on July 02, 2007, 08:21:27 pm
I was sort of assuming they were wearing smartsuits set to mostly transparent.

Filmsuits, from The Gallatin Divergence ::)