KiloSeven on March 23, 2007, 09:26:20 am
And, Wally the soccer-playin' Siamese cat was a nice touch, though most Siamese in our timeline's '47 don't have the muscle to play 'beat the goalie' with a rolled-up 'dillo.  Our timeline has them still as exoitic show cats, pretty much. Anyone have any theories? Or, was Wally a Seal Point-Wildcat cross?
--
"We're not living in a simulation. We're living in a collaborative SF novel... and now, of course, it's Philip K. Dick's turn.  In a back room somewhere, Vernor Vinge and George Orwell are currently arguing about who gets to take over in 2025." (Ross Smith)   K7AAY PDX OR USA TERRA

Rocketman on March 23, 2007, 10:58:24 am
Okay KiloSeven, how do you know that the cat is named Wally and not Willy since they were both called at the same time?  Or am I
missing something here?   8)

wdg3rd on March 23, 2007, 02:54:16 pm
And, Wally the soccer-playin' Siamese cat was a nice touch, though most Siamese in our timeline's '47 don't have the muscle to play 'beat the goalie' with a rolled-up 'dillo.  Our timeline has them still as exoitic show cats, pretty much. Anyone have any theories? Or, was Wally a Seal Point-Wildcat cross?

You must not be familiar with the Applehead Siamese, which is the original breed from before the cat show people started screwing things up.  We have two of them.  Huge.  Muscular.  Smarter than any show cat.  More likely to eat a German Shepherd than run from it.  Admittedly, Hoover (named for his appetite) is slowing down a bit in the second half of his teenage years, but Phantasm is in full form.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Sphynx on March 23, 2007, 03:32:00 pm
I'm with Rocketman, a 'dillo named Wally sounds appropriate, and a "Willy" cat, i.e. "Wile E. Coyote" seems appropriate as well.  Nice to know these fora (plural or Forum?) are useful for pointing out missed subtleties, as I missed the different names, I thoght the call was "Wally, WALLLYYY".

Question for the gathering: Do armadillo's really show the loyalty and inteliigence it takes to make a good mammalian pet?  The references I've read indicate they are difficult, smelly, and not as playful as this one appears.  Maybe its an alien too  ;)

Rocketman on March 23, 2007, 06:57:51 pm
While I'm a cat person, I don't have any "show" cats.  All of the 5 that we currently have and the 21 total that we have had during my lifetime are all strays that wouldn't have lasted very long if we hadn't take them in and cared for them.  Currently I have a long hair black Maine Coon named "Maximum Volume" that fits the fighting description of your Apple Siamese when he was younger.  Our Chow Chow having seen him in action just one time to this day gives him a WIDE BERTH.  I even wrote a song about him.

      Sung to the tune of "Some guys have all the luck"

                            My kitty kat's Maxxy V
                            His claws can shred a tree
                            He can leap at least fifty feet
                            Opens cat food cans with his teeth
                            He can tear a car in two
                            Imagine what he'd do to you
                            You may think he's all sweet and nice
                            But no ones ever lived to cross him twice.
                            Da da da d da da duh

wdg3rd on March 23, 2007, 09:53:33 pm
Of our seven fuzzy parasites, five are rescues from the streets of the local neighborhood.  One (Charley, well into his teens but still spry) was acquired by my late father-in-law when someone was moving into an assisted-living facility that didn't allow pets and the one (Bonnie) in the basement (because she hates cats -- we had a set of three (littermates, and likely the result of extreme inbreeding, they aged to morbidity in about five years)  that abused her terribly) came from a shelter.  Both of the appleheads came from the street, apparently someone local was raising them and tossing out rejects.

All, of course, are sterile.  Bonnie is the only one who spends any real amount of time outdoors.  Charley gets to go out occasionally, under supervision.

I have no idea whether an armadillo could be made a pet.  I've never seen a live one other than in a zoo.  All the rest I've seen were roadkill or bar and steakhouse decorations.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

KiloSeven on March 23, 2007, 10:21:42 pm
You must not be familiar with the Applehead Siamese, which is the original breed from before the cat show people started screwing things up.  We have two of them.  Huge.  Muscular.  Smarter than any show cat.  More likely to eat a German Shepherd than run from it.  Admittedly, Hoover (named for his appetite) is slowing down a bit in the second half of his teenage years, but Phantasm is in full form.

I sit corrected. Spoke w/ the out-laws, who have an apple-head flame-point from B.C. who's their cham-peen mouser.
--
"We're not living in a simulation. We're living in a collaborative SF novel... and now, of course, it's Philip K. Dick's turn.  In a back room somewhere, Vernor Vinge and George Orwell are currently arguing about who gets to take over in 2025." (Ross Smith)   K7AAY PDX OR USA TERRA

Rocketman on March 24, 2007, 04:02:19 am
Max is no longer the cat he used to be.  At 10 1/2 years old he no longer jumps the 5 1/2 feet straight up and gets on the fireplace mantel, knocking off everything and getting everyone mad at him and is nearly 3 pounds lighter than he used to be from his original "fighting" weight. But when he was in his prime he was a holy terror.
(And I've got the scars from an episode when he was a year and a half old to prove it.)  These days he mostly spends chasing a ball and our other upstairs cat, Ashley around.  Our other strays are downstairs and need to be seperated from Max and Ashley.  Their names are Colby, Cheddar and Caviare and we found them when they were just 6 weeks old in an old 55 gallon drum down in our barn.  A wild mother cat had been killed on the field across from ours and they were her offspring.  We took them and and raised them.  Their all good cats and are like members of the family.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2007, 04:11:42 am by Rocketman »

Frank B. on March 25, 2007, 06:41:49 pm
Question for the gathering: Do armadillo's really show the loyalty and inteliigence it takes to make a good mammalian pet?  The references I've read indicate they are difficult, smelly, and not as playful as this one appears.  Maybe its an alien too  ;)

I've lived in Texas my entire life, and I've yet to meet anyone who's had one as a pet.  From my hiking experiences, I know they're smart enough to give humans a wide berth.  And from my friends who have had gardens, they're a terrible pest.  They are natural diggers and can destroy a lot in a single night.  They are a great symbol, but I don't think I'd want to keep one.

Sphynx on March 28, 2007, 12:03:48 pm
Frank: Another Texan, cool!  RE: mammalian tanks, your comment reminded me of a bit of armadillo trivia:  Seems that, back in 1930's, a Florida service station owner was visiting texas when he saw his first armadillo.  Since his business had one of those "road-side" zoos to bring in extra money, he took a breeding pair back and installed them as the new premier exhibit.  Unfortunately, he didin't know, or wasn't told about their subterranian habits and put them in a simple wood framed chicken wire cage with a dirt floor.

About two days later, he had a fresh tunnel in the ground and no prize attractions anymore.  This pair is credited with creating the armadillo menace in Florida, which still destroys golf courses today!   Armadillos are native to the US/Mexico West of the Mississippi River, but not east ward.

Don't know if the story is true, but it sounds good :).

Rocketman on March 28, 2007, 06:15:06 pm
Kind of reminds me of the story of the early 18th century British Sea Captain that brought a pair of breeding rabbits from England to Australia where they multiplied like, well you know.  They started driving out other native animals and eating fauna in dry lands that became deserts because nothing then existed that retained water.   >:(

Zen Redneck on March 29, 2007, 09:25:28 am
And if there's not just one lamviin in Texas, but a breeding trio....

wdg3rd on March 29, 2007, 10:41:59 am
Frank: Another Texan, cool!  RE: mammalian tanks, your comment reminded me of a bit of armadillo trivia:  Seems that, back in 1930's, a Florida service station owner was visiting texas when he saw his first armadillo.  Since his business had one of those "road-side" zoos to bring in extra money, he took a breeding pair back and installed them as the new premier exhibit.  Unfortunately, he didin't know, or wasn't told about their subterranian habits and put them in a simple wood framed chicken wire cage with a dirt floor.

About two days later, he had a fresh tunnel in the ground and no prize attractions anymore.  This pair is credited with creating the armadillo menace in Florida, which still destroys golf courses today!   Armadillos are native to the US/Mexico West of the Mississippi River, but not east ward.

Don't know if the story is true, but it sounds good :).

First place I ran across that story was in the novel Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank.  Read it for the first time about 1965.  Still probably one of the best nuclear war novels around.

Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Sphynx on March 29, 2007, 06:39:24 pm
wdg3rd: OUCH, hoist on my own petard!

That book is exactly where I first encountered the story I told.  It was not my intention to prevaricate or plagarize, especially not Mr. Frank.  I just looked at my ragged paperback (32nd printing, 1976, by Bantam Books), for the first time in 8-10 years.  I first read this story in 10th-11th grade and at least once every 5 years till recently (yes, I'm approaching 45).  Obviously I took some of the side story to heart.

Speaking of Alas, Babylon, it was probably a secondary source (after Rober A. Heinlein) for proto-libretarian concepts.

To all readers, my dejected abject appologies for not remembering and stating the source of my anecdote.

Rocketman on March 29, 2007, 09:04:33 pm
Pat Frank was in reality Henry Hart the writer.  Funny since "Alas Babylon" was by far his greatest work, you would have thought he would have wanted to get credit for it.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 09:13:28 pm by Rocketman »