Sean Roach on December 27, 2009, 01:00:28 pm
I just got finished reading "Darkship Thieves" by Sarah Hoyt.
Good book.  The book has two main "states", a totalitarian earth, and a hollowed out asteroid run by anarchists.  The heroine is a refugee from the former, (where she lived a life of privalege, but had a sudden...reduction in projected lifespan.)

Yes, it's a Baen book, unfortunately it's not in the free library, yet anyway.  It just came out.

dough560 on January 03, 2010, 04:38:01 am
Many of the books we read involve stories of people responding to problems with the powers that be.  With said powers being authoritarians.  Others speculate on responses to changing social conditions.  Whether through weather, economics or social change.  Many times all of these factors are present.  ;)

Several of my favorite authors and books have been the Probability Broach Series (and of course) Ceres and Pallas.  Others have been John Ross, "Unintended Consequences.", John Ringo, "The Last Centurion", and other books he's written.  Vince Flynn, "Term Limits" and the other books in the series.  William W. Johnstone wrote several books with libertarian principles.  John Dumas(?) "The General's President",  Jerry Ahern, "The Patriot Series",  Robert Heinlein, "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Farnham's Freehold, Revolt in 2100"....

You get the idea.  Anyone have have any other books they like or comments on some or all of the ones I've mentioned?   :)

Rocketman on January 03, 2010, 06:38:30 pm
Dough:  I've read some of the "Ashes" series by Johnson and I consider them more conservative than libertarian although enjoyable because I always enjoy stories where the bad guy gets exactly whats coming to him.  Ross's UC is also great but very long.  You left out Ayn Rand "Atlas Shrugged" and "The Fountainhead" .  I like her sentiments although they're a little hard to read.  One of my favorite writers although not a libertarian is Harry Turtledove.  His best work that I've read so far is "Guns of the South".  If you haven't read that yet, your really missing something.

dough560 on January 06, 2010, 12:52:54 pm
Haven't read Atlas Shrugged, but have read most of Harry's works.  Especially liked "Guns of the South".  A lot of these books are just fun.

Johnstone's Tri-state government is something a lot of us would be able to live with.  Very libertarian governmental construction,

Heard Johnstone died recently and his son is finishing up his manuscripts.
 
Kind of says something about us, the books we find fun and interesting.


Rocketman on January 06, 2010, 06:08:19 pm
Had not heard that he had died.  Hope that's not true.  I thought it was a rite of passage that every libertarian at one time in his or her life reads Atlas Shrugged.  Kind of like being a muslim and going to Mecca at least once in your life.  (Any muslim reading this I did not mean in the least way that as an insult)
« Last Edit: January 07, 2010, 10:50:15 am by Rocketman »

KBCraig on January 07, 2010, 10:01:33 am
Atlas Shrugged is not a fun read. It's ham-fisted and plodding. I made it through only because it's part of the canon of liberty literature. I've re-read it twice more, but I have yet to make it more than 5 pages into the "This is John Galt" speech. I mean... dayummm, we get it already!

Fountainhead is a far better novel, and some of AR's short stories are very good.

Rocketman on January 08, 2010, 01:10:27 pm
Checked on the internet today and found out that Johnstone died back in 2004.  One thing that I didn't know about him was how prolific he was as a writer.  Apparently he wrote at least 188 books!  Granted, they were not any great literary masterpieces but still that's a whole lot of writing to do.  That has to be near the greatest number of published books that were ever done by one man.  I noticed that a few of the books were authored with someone else but relatively few.

wdg3rd on January 09, 2010, 02:12:38 am
Checked on the internet today and found out that Johnstone died back in 2004.  One thing that I didn't know about him was how prolific he was as a writer.  Apparently he wrote at least 188 books!  Granted, they were not any great literary masterpieces but still that's a whole lot of writing to do.  That has to be near the greatest number of published books that were ever done by one man.  I noticed that a few of the books were authored with someone else but relatively few.

Not even close.  Asimov did at least 500 (and several _were_ great literary masterpieces).  Admittedly, most of his books were not fiction.

I never met Asimov.  He was in hospital and died shortly after I came to the NYC area (Jesu Cris, it's 18 years now).  My first ex-wife sat in his lap when she was a teen and when she was in her 30s.  (We were involved between those events).  I still admire that he said on the Dick Cavett show when I was still struggling with unbelief, "I'm an atheist, thank God".  (I still am, though I don't give thanks -- if any god is responsible for the crap I've been dealt, I will get even).
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

RobbinR on August 25, 2013, 12:37:30 pm

To the best of my memory, Rocket Ship Galileo by Robert Heinlein,
was the first Sci-Fi book I read, at eight years old, 62 years ago.

I recently ran into a free PDF of the entire book, and have started re-reading it.
It's naive by today's standards, as are most early sci-fi stories, but I'm going to finish it for old times sake.

Rocket Ship Galileo

I also ran across The Star Beast

/

 

anything