emb021 on October 02, 2009, 09:23:53 am
(wanted to create a new thread on this, but can't find the button to do so).

What's the deal with the women wearing chains?  I thought the first girls were slaves, but it appears that all women wear them.

I had read Henry Martyn, but don't recall that.


Frank Bieser on October 02, 2009, 10:53:25 pm
(wanted to create a new thread on this, but can't find the button to do so).

What's the deal with the women wearing chains?  I thought the first girls were slaves, but it appears that all women wear them.

I had read Henry Martyn, but don't recall that.



The way to create a new thread is from the board's topic list page.  There is a "new topic" link there.  I  went ahead and split your post to a new topic.

Mike on October 04, 2009, 08:56:08 am
(wanted to create a new thread on this, but can't find the button to do so).

What's the deal with the women wearing chains?  I thought the first girls were slaves, but it appears that all women wear them.

I had read Henry Martyn, but don't recall that.



Maybe I`m wrong, but I took the chains to be just part of a costume.

lee n. field on October 04, 2009, 09:40:48 pm
Quote
I had read Henry Martyn, but don't recall that.

I recall vaguely (only read it once, when it was newly published), in Bretta Martyn, that that was Hanoverian fashion for women. 

Scott on October 07, 2009, 10:43:49 pm
Lee is correct, the chains (called "emzeebies") are a Hanoverian (and fetishistic) fashion. The point being, in this culture, historically, women are generally considered the property of men, either their fathers or their husbands. Although, certain exceptional women can establish various measure of independence for themselves.

Lia Woodgate is one example. As the only surviving child of the former Ceo, and as well shall see, being an extraordinarily strong and resourceful person, she has established herself as ruler of this simultaneously advanced and backwards culture. There are strong parallels here with both Elizabethan and Victorian England.

Lia is endeavoring to improve her emprie's culture but this is a monumental task even for an absolute monarch, and progress is achingly slow.

wdg3rd on October 09, 2009, 02:58:15 pm
the chains (called "emzeebies")

And I didn't even know that Neil had read any of Marion's work.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

ZoeBrain on March 10, 2010, 03:13:11 am
Page 8 - the chains disappear on one of the servant girls.