John DeWitt on January 09, 2009, 06:56:08 am
As I recall, something really bad happens right after the barbeque...

Scott on January 09, 2009, 11:07:28 pm
Well, as it happens, this version of the tale doesn't always follow the traditional version(s).

So you'll just have to wait and see.

wdg3rd on January 11, 2009, 11:37:52 am
Well, as it happens, this version of the tale doesn't always follow the traditional version(s).

So you'll just have to wait and see.


Some of us have noticed.  I assume Homer used "poetic license" when he blindly told the story a few thousand years ago.  (You guys have got to get this stuff to rhyme, and set it to Rock -- we need a decent opera now, hasn't been one for decades, but this might do it -- get Brad Bird to supervise the animation and Neil Pert & crew to do the tunes).
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

SDGrant on May 11, 2009, 08:03:48 pm
Some of us have noticed.  I assume Homer used "poetic license" when he blindly told the story a few thousand years ago.  (You guys have got to get this stuff to rhyme, and set it to Rock -- we need a decent opera now, hasn't been one for decades, but this might do it -- get Brad Bird to supervise the animation and Neil Pert & crew to do the tunes).

There likely was never a historical Homer, but the story had been handed down orally for generations prior to being written down, so what we (in the Homeric form, I mean) have is really the cumulative version.  Which, as Eric Shanower pointed out to me, is the last Greek myth; THE ODYSSEUS is where Greek myth dies.  I'd had the basic idea long before I chatted with Eric about it one day, but when he said that it really sealed it for me.  As you may have noticed we get into the nature of story as a community activity, but that's really how this version is framed: as the last Greek myth.

- Grant

 

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