Monkt on January 07, 2009, 11:51:12 am
I was having an argument with my friend about the social acceptability of nudity (don't ask), and somehow we got onto the topic of Anarchist/Agorist law enforcement (still can't think of the exact phrase that would replace that.) would work. I told him that it would be mostly private investigators like Ed doing the work for private security companies. I guess in The Probability Broach and The American Zone showed this pretty well, but my friend was trying to tell me that it would be much harder for them to do their job without laws in place to help the investigators force people to cooperate with them. So what do you think?

wdg3rd on January 07, 2009, 08:05:41 pm
You get what we have now:  "Law Enforcement" officials more criminal and corrupt than the so-called bad guys.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Rocketman on January 08, 2009, 12:16:48 pm
Of course it would be a lot harder.  It would make it a lot easier if the law didn't say that cops needed a search warrent to search a person's home or office.  If beating a suspect into admission were legal.  If a cop could stop anyone at any time and search them without probable cause.  The entire point is that an individual has natural GOD given rights that no law is supposed to violate.  A citizen has rights, a slave has none.  And the vast majority of people don't seem to understand that.   :'(

Monkt on January 08, 2009, 01:26:25 pm
Of course it would be a lot harder.  It would make it a lot easier if the law didn't say that cops needed a search warrent to search a person's home or office.  If beating a suspect into admission were legal.  If a cop could stop anyone at any time and search them without probable cause.  The entire point is that an individual has natural GOD given rights that no law is supposed to violate.  A citizen has rights, a slave has none.  And the vast majority of people don't seem to understand that.   :'(
Well like we saw in TPB, private investigators still break into houses and rough people up a bit.

Rocketman on January 08, 2009, 06:05:05 pm
And you'll remember what (judge) Lucy had to say about it.  That what they were going to be doing was illegal and if they were caught there they could be shot, and that Madison was completely in his right to do so.

Monkt on January 08, 2009, 06:11:25 pm
And you'll remember what (judge) Lucy had to say about it.  That what they were going to be doing was illegal and if they were caught there they could be shot, and that Madison was completely in his right to do so.
Pretty much.

Scott on January 08, 2009, 07:46:57 pm
"Law enforcement' is not an inappropriate phrase. "Anarchism," after all, does not mean "no rules," it means "no rulers."

The North American Confederacy has a formal charter, I think, but no statutory laws to speak of. What laws they have are best understood as "common law," a body of judicial decisions developed over time an assented to by the large majority of the population. People consent to be judged according to this law because it makes interactions predictable, enhances security of rights, and is believed to be fair and reasonable.

Ultimately, law enforcement, or rights defense, is the responsibility of each individual, but the actual work can be delegated to private protection services, dispute resolution organizations, and judges-for-hire.

Monkt on January 09, 2009, 12:03:26 am
"Law enforcement' is not an inappropriate phrase. "Anarchism," after all, does not mean "no rules," it means "no rulers."

The North American Confederacy has a formal charter, I think, but no statutory laws to speak of. What laws they have are best understood as "common law," a body of judicial decisions developed over time an assented to by the large majority of the population. People consent to be judged according to this law because it makes interactions predictable, enhances security of rights, and is believed to be fair and reasonable.

Ultimately, law enforcement, or rights defense, is the responsibility of each individual, but the actual work can be delegated to private protection services, dispute resolution organizations, and judges-for-hire.
Wouldn't happen to have a copy of the NAC charter would you?

 

anything