H. Rearden on September 17, 2008, 06:13:46 pm
I can't get into the Odysseus story. It is very soap opra like.

wdg3rd on September 17, 2008, 09:07:19 pm
If you think this version is like a soap opera, try a translation of the original stuff attributed to Homer.  Page after page of stuff that would put an "All My Children" fan to sleep.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Scott on September 18, 2008, 03:43:59 pm
Give it some time. We sort of started in the middle (Odysseus on Circe's island) and will be moving backward and forward a bit. There will be more action. But the main focus of the story is the determination of Odysseus (and to some extent also Telemachus) to chart his own course in life, despite the wishes of either supernatural forces, or in Telemachus' case, earthly warlords.

Corydon on October 29, 2008, 05:29:21 am
Well, I've given it a go, and I'm in the "can't get into it" category as well.  Too much pontificating, too many one-dimensional villains, and an Odysseus who isn't much better.  (Yes, yes, you bend for no man or god.  We get it.  What a drip.) 

I'll come back in a month or two and see if things have picked up at all, but for now... meh.

John DeWitt on October 31, 2008, 09:28:25 am
(Yes, yes, you bend for no man or god.  We get it.  What a drip.) 

He is kind of a dick...   :-\

Zeppflyer on November 22, 2008, 11:26:41 am
He seems to combine everything that one hates about an Ayn Rand character.  Sorry, H. (I assume.).

Scott on November 22, 2008, 06:12:47 pm
I suppose I didn't convey sufficiently that Odysseus was not at all happy about Agamemnon knocking his mother around, but chose to remain focused on his purpose for visiting Hell. He and his crew are in danger there and he knows he needs to obtain what he came for and get out.

Sorry, Ma, maybe next time.

I don't think people are grasping the enormity of what Odysseus is trying to do here. In his world, the gods are real and they are tyrannical. To stand up to them, and against the culture that worships them, you pretty much have to be a completely driven, almost ruthless butt-head.

Or at least, seem that way to the people around you.

Rocketman on November 22, 2008, 11:00:31 pm
In his world, the gods are real and they are tyrannical. To stand up to them, and against the culture that worships them, you pretty much have to be a completely driven, almost ruthless butt-head.

Or at least, seem that way to the people around you.
  Wow!  You could almost be talking about how the rest of Americans relates to a  Libertarian.  Constantly explaining yourself to individuals who have just the tinest public school understanding of things like liberty and freedom.  Argueing with those who think that soundbites and slogans are a substitution for logic and reason and dealing with idiotic "zero tolerance" laws when the laws apply to someone other than them.  When the law is turned on them the zero tolerance is simply discarded.

SDGrant on May 11, 2009, 09:26:47 pm
I suppose I didn't convey sufficiently that Odysseus was not at all happy about Agamemnon knocking his mother around, but chose to remain focused on his purpose for visiting Hell. He and his crew are in danger there and he knows he needs to obtain what he came for and get out.

Besides, what's he going to do to Agamemnon?  Kill him?  If he gets off the ship he joins the ranks of hell...

(By the way, to whoever asked, our word "hell" derives from the Hebrew "Sheol."  The term "Hel" for the Norse goddess of the Underworld is either coincidental or a later Christianization, since Christianity started infecting Norse mythology well before the mythology started being codified in coherent form.)

- Grant