Rocketman on November 01, 2007, 01:58:03 am
Okay, this is just getting too confusing.  I understand Col. Morrison not liking the nazis very much but he's currently in command of a detachment of them (the ones that were on the airship) so why should he be firing on his own allies?  Are some of his nazis firing on the nazis from the flying wing?  And for that matter have some of the nazis that are with Morrison decided to shoot at Morrison and his new friends instead?  ???  ???  ???  ???

trainer on November 01, 2007, 08:46:50 am
That's the first thing that popped into my mind also....

I expect the Nazis shot in the last panel were paratroopers, but the ground troops seem to have dropped off the map...maybe they all have Uncles in Phoenix.

I trust the authors...I'm sure all will be explained...altho I have no clue how that's gonna happen.

DarianW on November 02, 2007, 11:33:16 am
Yeah, I'm not really sure what's going on either, but it sure looks cool!  I do remember a panel a while back in which Morrison was talking to one of the German commanders.  If my memory is right, the German said that all of his men were good guys and Morrison then asked "Then why are they Nazis?"  I don't think this question was answered.  Maybe some kind of mutiny happened that we are yet to be made aware of.

I could go back and look for clues, but it's more fun this way.

By the way, the flying wing airplane is a cool touch and I definitely laughed at the pinkness of its sound effects.

Rocketman on November 02, 2007, 06:32:55 pm
I think that it's interesting to notice that the nazi flying wing has a marked resemblance to Jack Northrup's YB-49 of about the same time period not including the wing tip stabilizers if I remember correctly.  The biggest problem with Northrup's a/c was an absolutely vicious stall that killed the test pilot named Edwards.  The same test pilot that Edwards AFB is named after. :(

enemyofthestate on November 03, 2007, 06:48:06 pm
I think that it's interesting to notice that the nazi flying wing has a marked resemblance to Jack Northrup's YB-49 of about the same time period not including the wing tip stabilizers if I remember correctly.  The biggest problem with Northrup's a/c was an absolutely vicious stall that killed the test pilot named Edwards.  The same test pilot that Edwards AFB is named after. :(
I thought it looked more like the XB-35.  Your right about the winglets.  Allthough the ideas originated about 1900, it wasn't until 1975 that Rutan frst put them on a production aircraft.

Unfortunately the flying wing design is dynamically unstable.  It wasn't until fly-by-wire that the flying wing and lifting body design became practical.  By the 1970s, when I entered the field, aircraft designers were deliberately developing airplanes like the F-16 that were unstable in flight but with greater maneuverability and eventually modern technology met an old idea and the inherent stealth advantages of the flying wing gave rise to the B-2 and the F-117.

Rocketman on November 03, 2007, 07:13:24 pm
Your right!!!  It should be the B-35 because the all jet version is the YB-49.  Good catch!  Your also correct about the stability problems before the advent of fly-by-wire.  You by any chance work in an aviation related industry?  ;D









trainer on November 04, 2007, 09:55:48 am
Nice touch that he beams are color-coded to their outfits.

Also note that the beams destroyed the flying wing rather than just dissolving it like they did with the bus, leaving living beings (men and geese) OK.

Rocketman on November 04, 2007, 12:22:42 pm
Yea, for the men in the wing, at least the ones without parachutes, that first step is going to be a doozy.   ;D

enemyofthestate on November 04, 2007, 12:32:44 pm
Your right!!!  It should be the B-35 because the all jet version is the YB-49.  Good catch!  Your also correct about the stability problems before the advent of fly-by-wire.  You by any chance work in an aviation related industry?  ;D
I did metallurgy and quality engineering for about 13 years for various aerospace firms.   I switched to Telecommunication after Aerospace took a nosedive in '91.

Rocketman on November 04, 2007, 05:59:55 pm
I kind of figured.  I've worked at Pratt and Whitney direct for 3 1/2 years as a drafter.  Then went the independant contractor route and worked at General Electric, Allison Rolls Royce then back to Pratt 4 more different times as a designer.  Went direct as a designer at the underwater electronic warfare dept at Magnavox before they were bought out by Hughes and at ITT where I did packaging design on the SINGARS military tactical field radio.  I finished up my career at a little UAV company near my mom's house that went out of business a year ago.

Mr. Mxyzptlk on November 05, 2007, 05:36:17 pm
Everyone hates Nazis...  Even Nazis hate Nazis.

Wow.  That's alot of the word "Nazi" in one thread...  Does that mean Godwin's Law is invoked?
My soul was removed to make room for all this sarcasm...

cavalier58 on November 07, 2007, 05:35:49 pm
This may be a dumb question Dept:   Nazis??   Whyhowcome there Nazis At All?   The circumstances that brought Mr. Hitler and his firends to power in the 1930's Weimar Republic do not exist in this timeline....so how is it they seem to be a dominant political force (let alone exist at all)?    Or did I miss something?


jrl on November 07, 2007, 07:24:51 pm
YB-49:  IIRC, before the Air Force canned the project, Honeywell had been working with Northrup on a computer to make the YB-49 fly as though it was a stable airplane. Seems like they called it "Little Huey" or something like that.

I doubt if they were going all the way to fly-by-wire, but the computer didn't need to be able to take full control, just make constant small adjustments on the pitch and yaw axies  to make up for not having a tail.

The material I've seen isn't clear whether "Little Huey" was digital or analog. . . My alma-mater was still using analog computers in flight simulation equipment well into the 1970s, for near-instant response.

41 mag on November 08, 2007, 04:38:30 am
i suggest that  you take into account that Jack Northrups single seat prototypes flew very well and the prop version of the wing did also.
     What seemed to screw the pooch is that he was forced to use the very crude jet engines of the time that were not only unreilable but had a severe lag-time in throttle response. That being the case if the pilot entered a stall condition that could be powered out of, the lag time was such it was an unrecoverable condition. I will also point out that the flying wing was not only an american concept, the Horten brothers in Germany worked on a very similar design as did DeHavilland in england

John DeWitt on November 08, 2007, 02:59:18 pm
Wow.  That's alot of the word "Nazi" in one thread...  Does that mean Godwin's Law is invoked?

Not sure Godwin's Law applies to a thread that's actually about Nazis.

 

anything