0z79 on November 02, 2017, 05:14:49 am
Respectfully, Mr. Bieser... are you sure you don't mean "barmier", rather than "balmier"? Because "barmy" means that one is insane, whereas "balmy" is a word to describe the weather... at least, as far as I know.

Scott on November 02, 2017, 08:47:52 am
Dictionary.com disagrees with you.

Redwood Elf on November 03, 2017, 09:41:25 am
Well Dictionary.com also gives the massively overused "wrong" definition of "Decimate" as definition 1 instead of 3.  So many people confused "Decimate" for "Devastate" that the word got changed.

0z79 on November 03, 2017, 07:14:56 pm
Dictionary.com disagrees with you.

Your comic, your colloquialisms. It's not like I'm trying to get banhammnered for disagreeing with the author. Please, be gentle kind sir!!

Scott on November 04, 2017, 02:14:02 pm
Dictionary.com disagrees with you.

Your comic, your colloquialisms. It's not like I'm trying to get banhammnered for disagreeing with the author. Please, be gentle kind sir!!

Oh, relax. I only use the banhammer on Nazis, Stalinists, and IRS agents.

Skull the Troll on November 07, 2017, 08:19:06 am
Both have the more or less same definition. Balmy is the North American version. Barmy is British.

Scott on November 07, 2017, 11:50:27 am
Both have the more or less same definition. Balmy is the North American version. Barmy is British.
Actually "balmy" is the formal version in both North American and British English. "Barmy" is a slang form used in Britain.
Theo is an educated Briton. Attended Eaton, Cambridge and Oxford, on scholarships.

Archer on November 11, 2017, 11:30:34 am
Both have the more or less same definition. Balmy is the North American version. Barmy is British.
Actually "balmy" is the formal version in both North American and British English. "Barmy" is a slang form used in Britain.
Theo is an educated Briton. Attended Eaton, Cambridge and Oxford, on scholarships.


Far be it from me to pick at nits, but this is not true. Barmy is and has always been the British way of calling someone a bit of a nut. It comes to us via the 15th century and the word barm, which meant "froth". Someone who is barmy is frothing mad and may require a soothing balm. Barm Cake - a type of light bread roll - have the same root: they're a bread-cake traditionally made with the yeasty froth (or barm) that formed on top of ale as it was brewing. Cakes made from "barm". Barm Cakes.

Balmy here means the weather is pleasant (the best time for drinking a decent ale and eating a barm and chips, if you ask me). If it is used as a synonym for barmy, it's extremely rare and probably a case of modern folk etymology sneaking in.

But what's a consonant between friends, after so many centuries gallivanting around the universe? :)

0z79 on December 01, 2017, 06:22:47 pm
Dictionary.com disagrees with you.

Your comic, your colloquialisms. It's not like I'm trying to get banhammnered for disagreeing with the author. Please, be gentle kind sir!!

Oh, relax. I only use the banhammer on Nazis, Stalinists, and IRS agents.

That's good. I've been banned for less at other boards. Some of your colleagues are, let's say, a tiny bit oversensitive. Like, if someone says they'll update at least once every other week, they let it slip for two or three *months*, then of course fans are going to be asking questions, maybe be a bit miffed.

Ever since, I've been extra-careful to be completely deferential to the comic artists I love, ask very few questions if at all, avoid any sort of criticism at all, even constructive criticism.

Loving the comic, anticipating the next installment of the Q-verse. Cheers.