Bog on April 03, 2007, 07:03:59 am
I'm very much inclined to agree with Sphynx on this one.  Split-screen (there are numerous technical terms, depending on the precise type of shot) is costly, and what's worse, the actor has to get his brain around both roles, both sets of angles, both sets of set direction.   This is a huge, strange workload for someone who's also attempting to convey emotion, and not many actors can pull it off.

Also, yeah, the age difference on the Brothers Bear is really pretty darn huge - not quite Donald Sutherland/Keifer Sutherland huge, but big enough for a father/son combo of actors to be preferable to one actor twice. 

I guess this comes down to finding two non-Star actors, really - can't think of an appropriate pairing off the top of my head.   Then again, nobody really knew Nathan Fillion from a bar of soap before Firefly - sometimes, getting people who aren't "stars" can be the best choice.

wdg3rd on April 03, 2007, 02:02:57 pm
I guess this comes down to finding two non-Star actors, really - can't think of an appropriate pairing off the top of my head.   Then again, nobody really knew Nathan Fillion from a bar of soap before Firefly - sometimes, getting people who aren't "stars" can be the best choice.

Actually, fans of soaps and sitcoms knew of him previously.  But he was a new face to me.

He's showing up in a new series on Fox starting 15 April called "Drive".
"Drive follows the lives of a group of Americans racing each other in a sinister and possibly mortal cross-country race. Each has a special reason to compete - and each must win. Among the racers are two brothers in a stolen, pimped-out Cadillac that carries secrets of its own, a man trying to find his missing wife, a scientist and his teenage daughter, and others. No one knows who they're racing or where the finish line is, so anything is possible."
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Bog on April 04, 2007, 07:12:19 am
Sounds... erm. 

But you take my point - not your actual Bruce Willis or Morgan Freeman grade superstar, just someone who's been acting for yonks and gotten rather good at it.

Rocketman on April 04, 2007, 08:45:27 pm
Wdg3rd:
     The plot for "Drive" kind of sounds like the plot of "Lost".   :D

wdg3rd on April 05, 2007, 02:44:20 pm
Wdg3rd:
     The plot for "Drive" kind of sounds like the plot of "Lost".   :D

Never watched a single episode.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

Frankjc3rd on April 09, 2007, 02:54:47 am
Thought had occurred to me.  What if someone really rich but unconnected to the television/ movie industry were to walk into the offices of the Scifi channel and say something like "I've read The "Probability Broach" and I think it really has potential."  "I'm willing to put up 10 million of my own money if your willing to produce and film it for your channel."  "You can use the money to make it and are essentially free from any possibility of loss."  Can anybody tell me that this is possible or not?  Okay, okay I KNOW IT'S NOT LIKELY TO HAPPEN, BUT IS IT POSSIBLE?   ;D

When I hit the Powerball you can set up the meeting, OK.
Nothing is forever, but the internet comes close.
Anonymous
I know me, I've seen me do it.
Ron White

Rocketman on April 09, 2007, 04:49:58 am
Frank, what I was trying to get at is that there are a group of very wealthy libertarians who would have the financial means to fund TPB if they decided to.  David Koch who was a former VP candidate for the LP for one example.  What I was asking was to find out if money is all that is neccessary if someone wanted TPB made.

Scott on April 10, 2007, 08:21:59 pm
A financial "angel" (as they are called) would be very helpful but you'd also need an experienced producer to put together a production team. Sci-Fi doesn't do their own productions, they buy projects brought to them by producers.


Frankjc3rd on April 21, 2007, 07:58:03 am
Frank, what I was trying to get at is that there are a group of very wealthy libertarians who would have the financial means to fund TPB if they decided to.  David Koch who was a former VP candidate for the LP for one example.  What I was asking was to find out if money is all that is neccessary if someone wanted TPB made.

That could be a possibility.  Folks usually need to see a fictional version to get used to the idea.  Sometimes TV shows and movies accidentally predict the future.  :)
Nothing is forever, but the internet comes close.
Anonymous
I know me, I've seen me do it.
Ron White

RannFox on October 18, 2007, 06:08:13 pm
John Cleese as the voice of Olongoo Fanshaw.

Quote

heehee yeah, totally- although I think Terry Jones would be even better for the dolphin's voice. Something about the Welsh accent. There's nothing stuffy about a dolphin, which is the image Cleese's voice tends to bring.
Quote

  Please forgive me for nit picking but it sounds like your getting characters confused, Olongo Fanshaw is a gorilla, Ooloory P'wheet (forgive the spelling) is the dolphin

H. Rearden on January 27, 2008, 09:53:57 pm
Pretend someone has money to burn.  Now pretend they would like to bankroll a "The Probability Broach" mini series.

Who would you cast for the lead roles?

I have some names, (and some faces where the names escape me) but I'm curious as to other ideas.

This is not a lead role but my choice for Buckley F. Williams would be William F. Buckley Jr. ;D

I would cast myself in some role.  Perhaps one of the lead roles. I would cast the chimp named Pan who is on that Japanese tv show for the role of that ape that is inthe story. That chimp is rather clever.

Pan cooks noodles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=id_jIZTH4zA

                                       
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 10:05:29 pm by H. Rearden »

Rocketman on January 27, 2008, 10:09:28 pm
Don't quote me but I always thought, or rather assumed that Buckley F. Williams was patterned in real life after
William F. Buckley  ;D

H. Rearden on January 27, 2008, 10:11:35 pm
Don't quote me but I always thought, or rather assumed that Buckley F. Williams was patterned in real life after
William F. Buckley  ;D

I think so too. That is why he would be good for that role. ;D

                         $

Scott on January 30, 2008, 09:38:16 pm
In fact, he was.

Is WFB still alive?

wdg3rd on February 03, 2008, 06:49:21 pm
In fact, he was.

Is WFB still alive?


Last I heard, he's still alive and well at 82.  I know I've seen columns by him fairly recently.  Yup, he's still writing a regular column on National Review Online, the latest was dated yesterday.

Certainly wouldn't cast him as a live-action Buckley Williams.  He's too far old to be convincing as someone with access to Confederate medical care.
Ward Griffiths        wdg3rd@aol.com

Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest.  --  Denis Diderot

 

anything